Photo of Jill Townsley

Accepting PhD Students

PhD projects

Repetition is ubiquitous across all fields of human endeavour from clinical scientific enquiry to daily routine. It is well contextualised through philosophical consideration from Plato’s mimesis through to postmodern simulacra and beyond. It also has a fundamental position within visual art practice, it may for example be generative, accumulative or definitive of a limit or failure. Repetition is implicitly linked to time, temporality, recurrence and in Nietzschean terms to ‘this moment’. It can disrupt and disperse authorship through transient forms of presentation, (including the viewer) or equally claim its own authorship through procedural systems of production. This practice-based research will consider how repetition may operate through contemporary art practice, either towards its conception, process, presentation or form. The type of visual practice is open to the researcher’s specialism (sculpture, painting, performance, film, photography etc or a combination of). The aim is to classify more clearly the differing modes of repetition as identified through visual art practice and acknowledge the implications this may have for understanding the object of art.

20112019
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Fingerprint Dive into the research topics where Jill Townsley is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Engineering & Materials Science

Fires
Computer science
Petri nets
Piles
Water
Communication systems
Binary codes
Radio frequency identification (RFID)
Communication
Big data
Innovation
Antennas

Arts & Humanities

Art
Washington, D.C.
Artist
Carbon
Labor
Solo Exhibition
Artwork
Thought
Huddersfield
World Wide Web
Athens
Institute of Contemporary Arts
Erasure
Temporality
Authorship
Spoon
Dedication

Earth & Environmental Sciences

European Commission
art
project
democracy
landmine
laboratory
metal
footing
bamboo
ground penetrating radar
research centre
garden
freedom
sensor