A comparison of several methods of macular hole measurement using optical coherence tomography, and their value in predicting anatomical and visual outcomes

Laura Wakely, Rubina Rahman, John Stephenson

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: To compare several methods of macular hole measurement using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to assess their predictive capability against anatomical and visual outcomes in a single cohort of patients. Methods: A retrospective study of 50 eyes undergoing standardised macular hole surgery. All patients underwent preoperative OCT scanning with measurement of macular hole inner opening diameter, minimum linear diameter, base diameter and macular hole height. Values were calculated for the macular hole index and the tractional hole index. Results: Logistic regression analyses indicated that the preoperative base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter were associated with both anatomical and visual success. Derived parameters as alternatives to these basic ophthalmic parameters add little to the modelling of either anatomical or visual success. Conclusion: Base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter can each be used to predict anatomical and/or functional success in macular hole surgery. Preoperative base diameter is the most useful variable in this regard, as it holds the strongest association with anatomical and visual outcome and is easily measured on a OCT scan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1003-1007
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume96
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2012

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Retinal Perforations
Optical Coherence Tomography
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Cite this

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title = "A comparison of several methods of macular hole measurement using optical coherence tomography, and their value in predicting anatomical and visual outcomes",
abstract = "Background/Aims: To compare several methods of macular hole measurement using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to assess their predictive capability against anatomical and visual outcomes in a single cohort of patients. Methods: A retrospective study of 50 eyes undergoing standardised macular hole surgery. All patients underwent preoperative OCT scanning with measurement of macular hole inner opening diameter, minimum linear diameter, base diameter and macular hole height. Values were calculated for the macular hole index and the tractional hole index. Results: Logistic regression analyses indicated that the preoperative base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter were associated with both anatomical and visual success. Derived parameters as alternatives to these basic ophthalmic parameters add little to the modelling of either anatomical or visual success. Conclusion: Base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter can each be used to predict anatomical and/or functional success in macular hole surgery. Preoperative base diameter is the most useful variable in this regard, as it holds the strongest association with anatomical and visual outcome and is easily measured on a OCT scan.",
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AU - Rahman, Rubina

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N2 - Background/Aims: To compare several methods of macular hole measurement using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to assess their predictive capability against anatomical and visual outcomes in a single cohort of patients. Methods: A retrospective study of 50 eyes undergoing standardised macular hole surgery. All patients underwent preoperative OCT scanning with measurement of macular hole inner opening diameter, minimum linear diameter, base diameter and macular hole height. Values were calculated for the macular hole index and the tractional hole index. Results: Logistic regression analyses indicated that the preoperative base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter were associated with both anatomical and visual success. Derived parameters as alternatives to these basic ophthalmic parameters add little to the modelling of either anatomical or visual success. Conclusion: Base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter can each be used to predict anatomical and/or functional success in macular hole surgery. Preoperative base diameter is the most useful variable in this regard, as it holds the strongest association with anatomical and visual outcome and is easily measured on a OCT scan.

AB - Background/Aims: To compare several methods of macular hole measurement using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to assess their predictive capability against anatomical and visual outcomes in a single cohort of patients. Methods: A retrospective study of 50 eyes undergoing standardised macular hole surgery. All patients underwent preoperative OCT scanning with measurement of macular hole inner opening diameter, minimum linear diameter, base diameter and macular hole height. Values were calculated for the macular hole index and the tractional hole index. Results: Logistic regression analyses indicated that the preoperative base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter were associated with both anatomical and visual success. Derived parameters as alternatives to these basic ophthalmic parameters add little to the modelling of either anatomical or visual success. Conclusion: Base diameter, macular hole inner opening and minimum linear diameter can each be used to predict anatomical and/or functional success in macular hole surgery. Preoperative base diameter is the most useful variable in this regard, as it holds the strongest association with anatomical and visual outcome and is easily measured on a OCT scan.

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