'A constant irritation to the townspeople'? Local, Regional and National Politics and London's County Asylums at Epsom

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Abstract

In 1908, The Times described London County Council's asylums near Epsom as 'a constant irritation to the townspeople'. The article was specifically concerned with the patient walking parties that made their way into the town. This, and references to the site of the asylum, focused on the sense of imposition as local residents were forced to contend with London's insane population. As the 'townspeople' negotiated the impact of the asylums, the Urban District Council and Lord Rosebery, a former Prime Minister, were to play central roles. The aim of this article is to uncover the motivations of the Council and Rosebery and the roles that first the asylums and then their patients played in the development of their views. Ultimately, it will be argued that although the Council and Rosebery operated outside the management structure of London Asylums, they were able to instigate changes to the ways in which patients were managed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)653-671
Number of pages19
JournalSocial History of Medicine
Volume26
Issue number4
Early online date3 May 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2013

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abstract = "In 1908, The Times described London County Council's asylums near Epsom as 'a constant irritation to the townspeople'. The article was specifically concerned with the patient walking parties that made their way into the town. This, and references to the site of the asylum, focused on the sense of imposition as local residents were forced to contend with London's insane population. As the 'townspeople' negotiated the impact of the asylums, the Urban District Council and Lord Rosebery, a former Prime Minister, were to play central roles. The aim of this article is to uncover the motivations of the Council and Rosebery and the roles that first the asylums and then their patients played in the development of their views. Ultimately, it will be argued that although the Council and Rosebery operated outside the management structure of London Asylums, they were able to instigate changes to the ways in which patients were managed.",
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