A Latent Class Analysis of Psychopathic Traits in Civil Psychiatric Patients

The Role of Criminal Behaviour, Violence, and Gender

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to determine whether distinct subgroups of psychopathic traits exist in a sample of civil psychiatric patients, using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Project (n = 810), by means of latent class analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to interpret the nature of the latent classes, or groups, by estimating the associations with criminal behaviour, violence, and gender. The best fitting latent class model was a 4-class solution: a 'high psychopathy class' (class 1; 26.4%), an 'intermediate psychopathy class' (class 2; 16.0%), a 'low affective-interpersonal and high antisocial-lifestyle psychopathy class' (class 3; 31.3%), and a 'normative class' (class 4; 26.3%). Each of the latent classes was predicted by differing external variables. Psychopathy is not a dichotomous entity, rather it falls along a skewed continuum that is best explained by four homogenous groups that are differentially related to gender, and criminal and violent behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-249
Number of pages13
JournalHoward Journal of Criminal Justice
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

Fingerprint

criminality
violence
gender
risk assessment
Group
logistics
regression

Cite this

@article{15c6258cf11a4bf8803eb51212546a89,
title = "A Latent Class Analysis of Psychopathic Traits in Civil Psychiatric Patients: The Role of Criminal Behaviour, Violence, and Gender",
abstract = "This study aimed to determine whether distinct subgroups of psychopathic traits exist in a sample of civil psychiatric patients, using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Project (n = 810), by means of latent class analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to interpret the nature of the latent classes, or groups, by estimating the associations with criminal behaviour, violence, and gender. The best fitting latent class model was a 4-class solution: a 'high psychopathy class' (class 1; 26.4{\%}), an 'intermediate psychopathy class' (class 2; 16.0{\%}), a 'low affective-interpersonal and high antisocial-lifestyle psychopathy class' (class 3; 31.3{\%}), and a 'normative class' (class 4; 26.3{\%}). Each of the latent classes was predicted by differing external variables. Psychopathy is not a dichotomous entity, rather it falls along a skewed continuum that is best explained by four homogenous groups that are differentially related to gender, and criminal and violent behaviour.",
keywords = "Civil psychiatric patients, Criminal behaviour, Latent class analysis, Psychopathy, Violence",
author = "Katie Dhingra and Daniel Boduszek and Susanna Kola",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/hojo.12128",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "237--249",
journal = "Howard Journal of Criminal Justice",
issn = "0265-5527",
publisher = "Basil Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Latent Class Analysis of Psychopathic Traits in Civil Psychiatric Patients

T2 - The Role of Criminal Behaviour, Violence, and Gender

AU - Dhingra, Katie

AU - Boduszek, Daniel

AU - Kola, Susanna

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - This study aimed to determine whether distinct subgroups of psychopathic traits exist in a sample of civil psychiatric patients, using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Project (n = 810), by means of latent class analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to interpret the nature of the latent classes, or groups, by estimating the associations with criminal behaviour, violence, and gender. The best fitting latent class model was a 4-class solution: a 'high psychopathy class' (class 1; 26.4%), an 'intermediate psychopathy class' (class 2; 16.0%), a 'low affective-interpersonal and high antisocial-lifestyle psychopathy class' (class 3; 31.3%), and a 'normative class' (class 4; 26.3%). Each of the latent classes was predicted by differing external variables. Psychopathy is not a dichotomous entity, rather it falls along a skewed continuum that is best explained by four homogenous groups that are differentially related to gender, and criminal and violent behaviour.

AB - This study aimed to determine whether distinct subgroups of psychopathic traits exist in a sample of civil psychiatric patients, using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Project (n = 810), by means of latent class analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to interpret the nature of the latent classes, or groups, by estimating the associations with criminal behaviour, violence, and gender. The best fitting latent class model was a 4-class solution: a 'high psychopathy class' (class 1; 26.4%), an 'intermediate psychopathy class' (class 2; 16.0%), a 'low affective-interpersonal and high antisocial-lifestyle psychopathy class' (class 3; 31.3%), and a 'normative class' (class 4; 26.3%). Each of the latent classes was predicted by differing external variables. Psychopathy is not a dichotomous entity, rather it falls along a skewed continuum that is best explained by four homogenous groups that are differentially related to gender, and criminal and violent behaviour.

KW - Civil psychiatric patients

KW - Criminal behaviour

KW - Latent class analysis

KW - Psychopathy

KW - Violence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930416835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/hojo.12128

DO - 10.1111/hojo.12128

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 237

EP - 249

JO - Howard Journal of Criminal Justice

JF - Howard Journal of Criminal Justice

SN - 0265-5527

IS - 3

ER -