A memetic analysis of a phrase by Beethoven: Calvinian perspectives on similarity and lexicon-abstraction

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Abstract

This article discusses some general issues arising from the study of similarity in music, both human-conducted and computer-aided, and then progresses to a consideration of similarity relationships between patterns in a phrase by Beethoven, from the first movement of the Piano Sonata in A flat major op. 110 (1821), and various potential memetic precursors. This analysis is followed by a consideration of how the kinds of similarity identified in the Beethoven phrase might be understood in psychological/conceptual and then neurobiological terms, the latter by means of William Calvin's Hexagonal Cloning Theory. This theory offers a mechanism for the operation of David Cope's concept of the lexicon, conceived here as a museme allele-class. I conclude by attempting to correlate and map the various spaces within which memetic replication occurs.

LanguageEnglish
Pages443-465
Number of pages23
JournalPsychology of Music
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015

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zaleplon
Music
Organism Cloning
Alleles
Psychology
Ludwig Van Beethoven
Lexicon
Memetics

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A memetic analysis of a phrase by Beethoven : Calvinian perspectives on similarity and lexicon-abstraction. / Jan, Steven.

In: Psychology of Music, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. 443-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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