A Preliminary Investigation of Potential Cognitive Performance Decrements in non-Help-Seeking Tinnitus Sufferers

Jamie G. Jackson, Iain J. Coyne, Peter Clough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the possible impact of tinnitus on the performance of challenging cognitive tasks.

Design: Participants completed the hospital anxiety and depression scale and completed two cognitive tasks: the Vienna determination task and a variant of the Stroop paradigm. In addition, tinnitus sufferers completed the subjective tinnitus severity scale. Study sample: Thirty-three tinnitus sufferers and 33 controls took part in the study (n = 66).

Results: Tinnitus sufferers were no more depressed nor anxious than controls, but they performed less well on both cognitive tasks.

Conclusions: Possible causes and implications of these performance decrements are discussed, with particular attention given to the possibility that subjective distress is an important moderating factor in tinnitus sufferers.
LanguageEnglish
Pages88-93
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
Volume53
Issue number2
Early online date5 Nov 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tinnitus
Vienna
performance
paradigm
anxiety
cause
Stroop Test
Cognitive Performance
Anxiety
Depression

Cite this

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A Preliminary Investigation of Potential Cognitive Performance Decrements in non-Help-Seeking Tinnitus Sufferers. / Jackson, Jamie G.; Coyne, Iain J.; Clough, Peter.

In: International Journal of Audiology, Vol. 53, No. 2, 2014, p. 88-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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