A preliminary investigation on the performance of brain-injured witnesses on target-absent line-up procedures.

Charlotte Gibert, Dara Mojtahedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study was a preliminary investigation that aimed to compare the performance of eyewitnesses with and without a brain injury on two target-absent line-up procedures: a simultaneous procedure and a sequential procedure with confidence ratings. A 2 × 2 design (N = 25) was employed, where both brain-injured (n = 15) and non-brain-injured (n = 10) participants were shown a short video of a non-violent crime taking place before taking part in either a simultaneous or sequential target-absent line-up. Participants’ general cognitive abilities and memory recall accuracy were also measured. Results found no significant differences in false identification rates between brain-injured and non-brain-injured witnesses. It was also found that participants with a greater memory accuracy were in fact more likely to make a false identification. The implications and limitations of the study are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-495
Number of pages16
JournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Law
Volume26
Issue number3
Early online date9 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2019

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witness
brain
Brain
performance
Aptitude
cognitive ability
Crime
Brain Injuries
video
confidence
rating
offense

Cite this

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A preliminary investigation on the performance of brain-injured witnesses on target-absent line-up procedures. / Gibert, Charlotte; Mojtahedi, Dara.

In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, Vol. 26, No. 3, 04.05.2019, p. 480-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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