A qualitative exploration of treatment decision-making role preference in adult asthma patients

Ann Louise Caress, Karen Luker, Ashley Woodcock, Kinta Beaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To explore preferred treatment decision-making roles, and rationales for role preference, and to identify perceived facilitators to and barriers from attaining preferred role. Design: Qualitative design. Setting and Participants: One secondary care and four primary care sites in North-west England. Purposive sample of 32 adult asthma patients with varied socio-economic backgrounds and disease severity. Methods: Tape-recorded focused-conversation style interviews. Interview topic guide derived from the literature. Sort cards employed to provide the focus for exploration of role preferences. Results: Active (n = 7), collaborative (n = 11) and passive (n = 14) decisional role preferences were identified. Respondents cited level of knowledge; trust; duration of condition; severity of condition at the decisional juncture; lifelong nature of asthma; a perception that 'it is my body'; characteristics of the individual and their response to health professionals as influencing role preference. Perceived facilitators and barriers to participation included condition-related knowledge, practical issues (e.g. lack of time during consultation) and clinicians' interpersonal skills. Conclusions: Most respondents wished to contribute to or feel involved in treatment decision-making, but not necessarily to control it. Some hindrances to participation would be amenable to intervention. The quality of the provider-patient relationship is central to facilitating participation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-235
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Expectations
Volume5
Issue number3
Early online date28 Aug 2002
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Decision Making
Asthma
Interviews
Secondary Care
Therapeutics
England
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Economics
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Caress, Ann Louise ; Luker, Karen ; Woodcock, Ashley ; Beaver, Kinta. / A qualitative exploration of treatment decision-making role preference in adult asthma patients. In: Health Expectations. 2002 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 223-235.
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A qualitative exploration of treatment decision-making role preference in adult asthma patients. / Caress, Ann Louise; Luker, Karen; Woodcock, Ashley; Beaver, Kinta.

In: Health Expectations, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.09.2002, p. 223-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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