'A sort of guerilla'

Che at the opera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The undoubted cause célèbre of the 1969 Holland Festival was the large-scale music theatre piece Reconstructie, jointly authored by a team of five young composers and two librettists. The work, which took as its subject 'the struggle against US imperialism in Latin America', and revolved around the figure of Che Guevara, embodied the authors' dual commitment to political engagement and artistic experiment. My account examines the work through the lens of recent scholarship that stresses the politically reactionary function of avant-garde experimentation within the cultural Cold War. In the process, attention is given to broader factors affecting the work's production and reception: these include contemporaneous debates about cultural popularising and the Holland Festival; the complex motives of the work's governmental patrons; and the influence upon the authors of Cuba, Castro and Guevara himself.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-193
Number of pages27
JournalCambridge Opera Journal
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Opera
Composer
Librettist
Cuba
Imperialism
Music Theatre
Latin America
Experiment
Patron
Avant Garde
Causes
Che Guevara
Reactionary
Cold
Experimentation
Reception

Cite this

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'A sort of guerilla' : Che at the opera. / Adlington, Robert.

In: Cambridge Opera Journal, Vol. 19, No. 2, 07.2007, p. 167-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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