A survey of people with foot problems related to rheumatoid arthritis and their educational needs

Andrea S. Graham, John Stephenson, Anita E. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Up to 50% of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have foot symptoms at diagnosis, hence early foot health intervention is recommended and this should include patient education. This study identifies, for the first time, the foot health education (FHE) needs of people with RA. Methods: An online survey of people with RA (n = 543) captured quantitative data in relation to the aims, methods of delivery, content, timing and accessibility of FHE. Results: The majority concurred about the aims of FHE. Verbal delivery and websites were the most common methods. Written and verbal FHE were perceived to be the most effective methods. The point of diagnosis was the preferred time to receive it. Lack of access to FHE included minimal focus on foot health during consultations by both health practitioners and patients with RA. Participant gender, age, disease duration and living situation had a statistically significant influence on the results. Conclusion: Foot health education is rarely considered within the medical consultation. There is a lack of patient and/or health professional awareness of this need with a detrimental impact on foot health. Patients require health professionals to identify their foot education health needs. Tailored foot health education should begin at initial diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Research
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2017

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Foot
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Health Education
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Patient Education

Cite this

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A survey of people with foot problems related to rheumatoid arthritis and their educational needs. / Graham, Andrea S.; Stephenson, John; Williams, Anita E.

In: Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, Vol. 10, No. 1, 12, 06.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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