A systematic review and metaethnography to identify how effective, cost-effective, accessible and acceptable self-management support interventions are for men with long-term conditions (SELF-MAN)

Paul Galdas, Zoe Darwin, Jennifer Fell, Lisa Kidd, Peter Bower, Christian Blickem, Kerri Mcpherson, Kate Hunt, Simon Gilbody, Gerry Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Self-management support interventions can improve health outcomes, but their impact is limited by the numbers of patients able or willing to access them. Men’s attendance at, and engagement with, self-management support appears suboptimal despite their increased risk of developing serious and disabling long-term conditions (LTCs).
Objectives: To assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, accessibility and acceptability of self-management support interventions in men with LTCs.
Methods: A quantitative systematic review with meta-analysis and a qualitative review using a metaethnography approach. The findings of the two reviews were integrated in parallel synthesis.
Data sources: In the quantitative review, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched to identify published reviews of self-management support interventions. Relevant reviews were screened to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of self-management support interventions conducted in men alone, or which analysed the effects of interventions by gender. In the qualitative review, the databases Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, EMBASE, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, PsycINFO and Social Science Citation Index (July 2013) were searched from inception to July 2013
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages336
JournalHealth Services and Delivery Research
Volume3
Issue number34
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

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