A Transactions Pattern for Structuring Unstructured Corporate Information in Enterprise Applications

Simon Polovina, Richard Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is known that 80-85% of all corporate information remains unstructured. As such, many enterprises rely on information systems that cause them to risk transactions that are based on lack of information (errors of omission) or misleading information (errors of commission). To address this concern, the fundamental business concept of monetary transactions is extended to include qualitative business concepts. A Transaction Model (TM) is accordingly identified that provides a structure for these unstructured but vital aspects of business transactions. By highlighting how unstructured information can be integrated into transactions, the TM provides businesses with a much more balanced view of the transactions they engage in or to discover novel transactions that they might have otherwise missed. A simple example is provided that illustrates this integration and reveals a key missing element. This discovery points to a transactions pattern that can be used to ensure that all the parties (or agents) in a transaction are identified, as well as capturing unstructured and structured information into a coherent framework. In support of the TM as a pattern, more examples of its use in a variety of domains are given. A number of enterprise applications are suggested such as in multi-agent systems, document text capture, and knowledge management.

LanguageEnglish
Pages33-47
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Intelligent Information Technologies
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Industry
Knowledge management
Multi agent systems
Information systems
Business concept

Cite this

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