Academics’ Perspectives on the Impact of Managerialism on Teaching International Students

Abdul Jabbar, Bejan Analoui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate academic perspectives of managerialism and how this impacts on the teaching of international students. This paper through the qualitative interviews of 22 business school academics discusses and presents our findings on issues of institutional empathy, the international student experience and the increase in managerialism and how they influence academic perspectives. This research is coming to the fore during a time of change where many institutions rely on international student numbers for financial health. This change in funding and the student body has implications for not only how Business schools teach and interact with students from an international background, but also the policies and procedures which govern this interaction. The findings indicate that increased managerialism creates pressures and perceptions whereby academics feel that they do not receive the necessary institutional support and lack the infrastructure to deliver inclusive learning development strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-78
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of International Business Education
Volume13
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

business school
Teaching
student
student body
qualitative interview
learning strategy
empathy
development strategy
funding
infrastructure
lack
interaction
health
experience
time

Cite this

@article{3323dcc9d5184a9fb5e139a6af593d76,
title = "Academics’ Perspectives on the Impact of Managerialism on Teaching International Students",
abstract = "In this paper, we investigate academic perspectives of managerialism and how this impacts on the teaching of international students. This paper through the qualitative interviews of 22 business school academics discusses and presents our findings on issues of institutional empathy, the international student experience and the increase in managerialism and how they influence academic perspectives. This research is coming to the fore during a time of change where many institutions rely on international student numbers for financial health. This change in funding and the student body has implications for not only how Business schools teach and interact with students from an international background, but also the policies and procedures which govern this interaction. The findings indicate that increased managerialism creates pressures and perceptions whereby academics feel that they do not receive the necessary institutional support and lack the infrastructure to deliver inclusive learning development strategies.",
keywords = "Internationalisation, Managerialism, Academic perceptions, International Students",
author = "Abdul Jabbar and Bejan Analoui",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "31",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "55--78",
journal = "Journal of International Business Education",
issn = "1649-4946",

}

Academics’ Perspectives on the Impact of Managerialism on Teaching International Students. / Jabbar, Abdul; Analoui, Bejan.

In: Journal of International Business Education, Vol. 13, 31.12.2018, p. 55-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Academics’ Perspectives on the Impact of Managerialism on Teaching International Students

AU - Jabbar, Abdul

AU - Analoui, Bejan

PY - 2018/12/31

Y1 - 2018/12/31

N2 - In this paper, we investigate academic perspectives of managerialism and how this impacts on the teaching of international students. This paper through the qualitative interviews of 22 business school academics discusses and presents our findings on issues of institutional empathy, the international student experience and the increase in managerialism and how they influence academic perspectives. This research is coming to the fore during a time of change where many institutions rely on international student numbers for financial health. This change in funding and the student body has implications for not only how Business schools teach and interact with students from an international background, but also the policies and procedures which govern this interaction. The findings indicate that increased managerialism creates pressures and perceptions whereby academics feel that they do not receive the necessary institutional support and lack the infrastructure to deliver inclusive learning development strategies.

AB - In this paper, we investigate academic perspectives of managerialism and how this impacts on the teaching of international students. This paper through the qualitative interviews of 22 business school academics discusses and presents our findings on issues of institutional empathy, the international student experience and the increase in managerialism and how they influence academic perspectives. This research is coming to the fore during a time of change where many institutions rely on international student numbers for financial health. This change in funding and the student body has implications for not only how Business schools teach and interact with students from an international background, but also the policies and procedures which govern this interaction. The findings indicate that increased managerialism creates pressures and perceptions whereby academics feel that they do not receive the necessary institutional support and lack the infrastructure to deliver inclusive learning development strategies.

KW - Internationalisation

KW - Managerialism

KW - Academic perceptions

KW - International Students

UR - http://www.neilsonjournals.com/JIBE/abstractjibe13jabbaranaloui.html

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 55

EP - 78

JO - Journal of International Business Education

JF - Journal of International Business Education

SN - 1649-4946

ER -