Addressing the relatively autonomous relationship between child maltreatment and child protection policies and practices

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Abstract

Child protection policies cannot be understood as simple reactions or responses to the phenomena of child maltreatment. They have their own dynamics and determinations to the point where they can be seen to operate quite independently of the phenomena that they are supposed to be trying to prevent. A whole range of political, cultural, and sociological influences come to bare which have the effect of deflecting such policies and systems from recognising the nature of the social problem of child maltreatment. The article develops the argument by summarising a number of both historical and comparative studies of child protection. It also draws upon prevalence studies to demonstrate that the problem is much bigger and more complex than is often assumed. In conclusion, it outlines ways in which this challenge can be addressed
LanguageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal on Child Maltreatment
Early online date23 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Aug 2019

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maltreatment of children
child protection
maltreatment
social problem

Cite this

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title = "Addressing the relatively autonomous relationship between child maltreatment and child protection policies and practices",
abstract = "Child protection policies cannot be understood as simple reactions or responses to the phenomena of child maltreatment. They have their own dynamics and determinations to the point where they can be seen to operate quite independently of the phenomena that they are supposed to be trying to prevent. A whole range of political, cultural, and sociological influences come to bare which have the effect of deflecting such policies and systems from recognising the nature of the social problem of child maltreatment. The article develops the argument by summarising a number of both historical and comparative studies of child protection. It also draws upon prevalence studies to demonstrate that the problem is much bigger and more complex than is often assumed. In conclusion, it outlines ways in which this challenge can be addressed",
keywords = "Child abuse and neglect, social harm, Child protection policies, Comparative studies, Prevalence, Social harm perspective",
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doi = "10.1007/s42448-019-00022-9",
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AB - Child protection policies cannot be understood as simple reactions or responses to the phenomena of child maltreatment. They have their own dynamics and determinations to the point where they can be seen to operate quite independently of the phenomena that they are supposed to be trying to prevent. A whole range of political, cultural, and sociological influences come to bare which have the effect of deflecting such policies and systems from recognising the nature of the social problem of child maltreatment. The article develops the argument by summarising a number of both historical and comparative studies of child protection. It also draws upon prevalence studies to demonstrate that the problem is much bigger and more complex than is often assumed. In conclusion, it outlines ways in which this challenge can be addressed

KW - Child abuse and neglect

KW - social harm

KW - Child protection policies

KW - Comparative studies

KW - Prevalence

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