5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In parts of the developing world deforestation rates are high and poverty is chronic and pervasive. Addressing these issues through the commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) has been widely researched, tested and discussed. While the evidence is inconclusive, there is growing understanding of what works and why and this paper examines the acknowledged success and failure factors. African forest honey has been relatively overlooked as an NTFP, an oversight this paper addresses. Drawing on evidence from a long-established forest conservation, livelihoods and trade development initiative in SW Ethiopia, forest honey is benchmarked against accepted success and failure factors and is found to be a near-perfect NTFP. The criteria are primarily focused on livelihood impacts and consequently this paper makes recommendations for additional criteria directly related to forest maintenance.
LanguageEnglish
Pages15-28
Number of pages14
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume62
Issue number1
Early online date8 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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Deforestation
nontimber forest product
honey
Conservation
commercialization
deforestation
poverty
developing world
livelihood

Cite this

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title = "African Forest Honey: an Overlooked NTFP with Potential to Support Livelihoods and Forests",
abstract = "In parts of the developing world deforestation rates are high and poverty is chronic and pervasive. Addressing these issues through the commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) has been widely researched, tested and discussed. While the evidence is inconclusive, there is growing understanding of what works and why and this paper examines the acknowledged success and failure factors. African forest honey has been relatively overlooked as an NTFP, an oversight this paper addresses. Drawing on evidence from a long-established forest conservation, livelihoods and trade development initiative in SW Ethiopia, forest honey is benchmarked against accepted success and failure factors and is found to be a near-perfect NTFP. The criteria are primarily focused on livelihood impacts and consequently this paper makes recommendations for additional criteria directly related to forest maintenance.",
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African Forest Honey : an Overlooked NTFP with Potential to Support Livelihoods and Forests. / Lowore, Janet; Meaton, Julia; Wood, Adrian.

In: Environmental Management, Vol. 62, No. 1, 07.2018, p. 15-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - African Forest Honey

T2 - Environmental Management

AU - Lowore, Janet

AU - Meaton, Julia

AU - Wood, Adrian

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

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AB - In parts of the developing world deforestation rates are high and poverty is chronic and pervasive. Addressing these issues through the commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) has been widely researched, tested and discussed. While the evidence is inconclusive, there is growing understanding of what works and why and this paper examines the acknowledged success and failure factors. African forest honey has been relatively overlooked as an NTFP, an oversight this paper addresses. Drawing on evidence from a long-established forest conservation, livelihoods and trade development initiative in SW Ethiopia, forest honey is benchmarked against accepted success and failure factors and is found to be a near-perfect NTFP. The criteria are primarily focused on livelihood impacts and consequently this paper makes recommendations for additional criteria directly related to forest maintenance.

KW - Beekeeping

KW - Ethiopia

KW - Forest conservation

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