An approach that helps break down gender stereotypes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Globally, the use of the skin to skin (STS) contact, also known as kangaroo care, has become widely used within neonatal units. Evidence suggests that STS has a number of significant benefits for both premature infants and their parents. Benefits include physiological stabilization of the infant such as improvement of gas exchange and body temperature regulation, and can provide pain relief. STS has also been found to promote the development of human attachment and bonding and facilitates and improves breastfeeding. Despite well researched benefits of STS, little evidence is available on the psychological benefits of STS for parents, in particular fathers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-13
Number of pages1
JournalNursing children and young people
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2014

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Skin
Parents
Macropodidae
Body Temperature Regulation
Human Development
Breast Feeding
Premature Infants
Fathers
Gases
Psychology
Pain

Cite this

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An approach that helps break down gender stereotypes. / Currell, Karen.

In: Nursing children and young people, Vol. 26, No. 1, 11.02.2014, p. 13-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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