An evaluation of the current urban design process in order to derive critical success factors for the creation of a potential new urban design process framework

Mahawattha Dias, Kaushal Keraminiyage, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Steve Curwell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The current urban design process is top-down, i.e., generally the urban designers or planners design the urban environment and at a later stage the community may have some involvement. There are serious criticisms of this process as it may not touch the “ground” level community, and therefore, there is a serious risk these projects will fail to create sustainable environments. Accordingly, in order to overcome the drawbacks of the current top-down process, researches have discussed implementing a bottom-up process in order to deliver sustainable urban designs. In the meantime the current top-down urban design process may have features which may positively affect for the creation of sustainable urban designs. Accordingly, this research paper discusses the critical success factors of the current top down urban design process which supports for a creation of a new potential urban design process framework. The research methodology adopted for this research is case study re-search reinforced by grounded theory where the researcher has evaluated a live urban design project process in North-West England. The evaluation has resulted deriving seven critical success factors. The “leadership” of the process has been identified as one of the major critical success factors among the other critical success factors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication"Making built environments responsive"
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 8th International Conference of the Faculty of Architecture Research Unit (FARU)
EditorsUpenda Rajapasksha
PublisherFaculty of Architecture: University of Moratuwa
Pages321-332
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9789559027539
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015
Event8th Faculty of Architecture Research Unit International Conference: 'Making Built Environments Responsive' - Colombo, Sri Lanka
Duration: 11 Dec 201512 Dec 2015
Conference number: 8
https://www.mrt.ac.lk/foa/faru/documents/faru%20proceedings%202015.pdf (Link to Conference Proceedings)

Conference

Conference8th Faculty of Architecture Research Unit International Conference
Abbreviated titleFARU
CountrySri Lanka
CityColombo
Period11/12/1512/12/15
Internet address

Cite this

Dias, M., Keraminiyage, K., Amaratunga, D., & Curwell, S. (2015). An evaluation of the current urban design process in order to derive critical success factors for the creation of a potential new urban design process framework. In U. Rajapasksha (Ed.), "Making built environments responsive": Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of the Faculty of Architecture Research Unit (FARU) (pp. 321-332). Faculty of Architecture: University of Moratuwa.
Dias, Mahawattha ; Keraminiyage, Kaushal ; Amaratunga, Dilanthi ; Curwell, Steve. / An evaluation of the current urban design process in order to derive critical success factors for the creation of a potential new urban design process framework. "Making built environments responsive": Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of the Faculty of Architecture Research Unit (FARU). editor / Upenda Rajapasksha. Faculty of Architecture: University of Moratuwa, 2015. pp. 321-332
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abstract = "The current urban design process is top-down, i.e., generally the urban designers or planners design the urban environment and at a later stage the community may have some involvement. There are serious criticisms of this process as it may not touch the “ground” level community, and therefore, there is a serious risk these projects will fail to create sustainable environments. Accordingly, in order to overcome the drawbacks of the current top-down process, researches have discussed implementing a bottom-up process in order to deliver sustainable urban designs. In the meantime the current top-down urban design process may have features which may positively affect for the creation of sustainable urban designs. Accordingly, this research paper discusses the critical success factors of the current top down urban design process which supports for a creation of a new potential urban design process framework. The research methodology adopted for this research is case study re-search reinforced by grounded theory where the researcher has evaluated a live urban design project process in North-West England. The evaluation has resulted deriving seven critical success factors. The “leadership” of the process has been identified as one of the major critical success factors among the other critical success factors.",
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Dias, M, Keraminiyage, K, Amaratunga, D & Curwell, S 2015, An evaluation of the current urban design process in order to derive critical success factors for the creation of a potential new urban design process framework. in U Rajapasksha (ed.), "Making built environments responsive": Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of the Faculty of Architecture Research Unit (FARU). Faculty of Architecture: University of Moratuwa, pp. 321-332, 8th Faculty of Architecture Research Unit International Conference, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 11/12/15.

An evaluation of the current urban design process in order to derive critical success factors for the creation of a potential new urban design process framework. / Dias, Mahawattha; Keraminiyage, Kaushal; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Curwell, Steve.

"Making built environments responsive": Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of the Faculty of Architecture Research Unit (FARU). ed. / Upenda Rajapasksha. Faculty of Architecture: University of Moratuwa, 2015. p. 321-332.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Dias M, Keraminiyage K, Amaratunga D, Curwell S. An evaluation of the current urban design process in order to derive critical success factors for the creation of a potential new urban design process framework. In Rajapasksha U, editor, "Making built environments responsive": Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of the Faculty of Architecture Research Unit (FARU). Faculty of Architecture: University of Moratuwa. 2015. p. 321-332