An investigation into blogging as an opportunity for work-integrated learning for journalism students

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose-Blogging has become a well-established method of online communication and publication, used by individuals and organisations to disseminate news, ideas and information. In their earlier forms, blogs were used as online diaries, but have now evolved into complex digital environments. The purpose of this paper is to consider whether blogging can be framed as a mode of work-integrated learning in the context of journalism and media education, and to ask whether blogging can develop transferable skills useful in graduate-level employment. Design/methodology/approach-Semi-structured interviews were conducted with established undergraduate bloggers to investigate which skills and attributes were developed through blogging. Findings-When evaluated against the Prospects UK list of graduate attributes (the Government career's service) blogging allows the development of the vast majority of transferable skills, abilities and behaviours expected of graduates. It is necessary to structure the curriculum to ensure that blogging is taught, and blogging activity monitored and evaluated, so that journalism undergraduates maximise the opportunities offered by blogging and fully reflect on their experiences. Originality/value-This paper argues that these online environments, with their associated communities, offer journalism students opportunities for work-integrated learning. It argues that blog environments have the potential to enable students to develop journalism-specific skills, and enhance transferable graduate attributes including creativity, sophisticated communication competencies, initiative and problem solving. It suggests that blogging offers a platform for accessing experiential learning, and as such should be considered within a curriculum for work-integrated learning in the journalism and media subject area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-180
Number of pages13
JournalHigher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2015

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communication
creativity
news
career
methodology
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Cite this

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