Antimicrobial activity of a chlorhexidine intravascular catheter site gel dressing

Tarja J. Karpanen, Anna L. Casey, Barbara R. Conway, Peter A. Lambert, Tom S J Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The antimicrobial efficacy of a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) intravascular catheter gel dressing was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Chlorhexidine deposition on the skin surface and release from the gel were determined. Methods: The antimicrobial efficacy was evaluated in in vitro studies following microbial inoculation of the dressing and application of the dressing on the inoculated surface of a silicone membrane and donor skin [with and without a catheter segment and/or 10% (v/v) serum] on diffusion cells. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated for up to 7 days. Chlorhexidine skin surface deposition and release were also determined. Results: MRSA and E. coli were not detectable within 5 min following direct inoculation onto the CHG gel dressing. On the silicone membrane, 3 log and 6 log inocula of MRSA were eradicated within 5 min and 1 h, respectively. Time to kill was prolonged in the presence of serum and a catheter segment. Following inoculation of donor skin with 6 log cfu of MRSA, none was detected after 24 h. Chlorhexidine was released from the gel after a lag time of 30 min and increasing amounts were detected on the donor skin surface over the 48 h test period. The CHG gel dressing retained its antimicrobial activity on the artificial skin for 7 days. Conclusions: The CHG intravascular catheter site gel dressing had detectable antimicrobial activity for up to 7 days, which should suppress bacterial growth on the skin at the catheter insertion site, thereby reducing the risk of infection.

LanguageEnglish
Article numberdkr191
Pages1777-1784
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

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Chlorhexidine
Bandages
Catheters
Gels
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Skin
Silicones
Artificial Skin
Escherichia coli
Membranes
beta-Lactamases
Serum
chlorhexidine gluconate
Growth
Infection

Cite this

Karpanen, Tarja J. ; Casey, Anna L. ; Conway, Barbara R. ; Lambert, Peter A. ; Elliott, Tom S J. / Antimicrobial activity of a chlorhexidine intravascular catheter site gel dressing. In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. 2011 ; Vol. 66, No. 8. pp. 1777-1784.
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abstract = "Objectives: The antimicrobial efficacy of a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) intravascular catheter gel dressing was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Chlorhexidine deposition on the skin surface and release from the gel were determined. Methods: The antimicrobial efficacy was evaluated in in vitro studies following microbial inoculation of the dressing and application of the dressing on the inoculated surface of a silicone membrane and donor skin [with and without a catheter segment and/or 10{\%} (v/v) serum] on diffusion cells. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated for up to 7 days. Chlorhexidine skin surface deposition and release were also determined. Results: MRSA and E. coli were not detectable within 5 min following direct inoculation onto the CHG gel dressing. On the silicone membrane, 3 log and 6 log inocula of MRSA were eradicated within 5 min and 1 h, respectively. Time to kill was prolonged in the presence of serum and a catheter segment. Following inoculation of donor skin with 6 log cfu of MRSA, none was detected after 24 h. Chlorhexidine was released from the gel after a lag time of 30 min and increasing amounts were detected on the donor skin surface over the 48 h test period. The CHG gel dressing retained its antimicrobial activity on the artificial skin for 7 days. Conclusions: The CHG intravascular catheter site gel dressing had detectable antimicrobial activity for up to 7 days, which should suppress bacterial growth on the skin at the catheter insertion site, thereby reducing the risk of infection.",
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Antimicrobial activity of a chlorhexidine intravascular catheter site gel dressing. / Karpanen, Tarja J.; Casey, Anna L.; Conway, Barbara R.; Lambert, Peter A.; Elliott, Tom S J.

In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Vol. 66, No. 8, dkr191, 08.2011, p. 1777-1784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Antimicrobial activity of a chlorhexidine intravascular catheter site gel dressing

AU - Karpanen, Tarja J.

AU - Casey, Anna L.

AU - Conway, Barbara R.

AU - Lambert, Peter A.

AU - Elliott, Tom S J

PY - 2011/8

Y1 - 2011/8

N2 - Objectives: The antimicrobial efficacy of a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) intravascular catheter gel dressing was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Chlorhexidine deposition on the skin surface and release from the gel were determined. Methods: The antimicrobial efficacy was evaluated in in vitro studies following microbial inoculation of the dressing and application of the dressing on the inoculated surface of a silicone membrane and donor skin [with and without a catheter segment and/or 10% (v/v) serum] on diffusion cells. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated for up to 7 days. Chlorhexidine skin surface deposition and release were also determined. Results: MRSA and E. coli were not detectable within 5 min following direct inoculation onto the CHG gel dressing. On the silicone membrane, 3 log and 6 log inocula of MRSA were eradicated within 5 min and 1 h, respectively. Time to kill was prolonged in the presence of serum and a catheter segment. Following inoculation of donor skin with 6 log cfu of MRSA, none was detected after 24 h. Chlorhexidine was released from the gel after a lag time of 30 min and increasing amounts were detected on the donor skin surface over the 48 h test period. The CHG gel dressing retained its antimicrobial activity on the artificial skin for 7 days. Conclusions: The CHG intravascular catheter site gel dressing had detectable antimicrobial activity for up to 7 days, which should suppress bacterial growth on the skin at the catheter insertion site, thereby reducing the risk of infection.

AB - Objectives: The antimicrobial efficacy of a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) intravascular catheter gel dressing was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Chlorhexidine deposition on the skin surface and release from the gel were determined. Methods: The antimicrobial efficacy was evaluated in in vitro studies following microbial inoculation of the dressing and application of the dressing on the inoculated surface of a silicone membrane and donor skin [with and without a catheter segment and/or 10% (v/v) serum] on diffusion cells. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated for up to 7 days. Chlorhexidine skin surface deposition and release were also determined. Results: MRSA and E. coli were not detectable within 5 min following direct inoculation onto the CHG gel dressing. On the silicone membrane, 3 log and 6 log inocula of MRSA were eradicated within 5 min and 1 h, respectively. Time to kill was prolonged in the presence of serum and a catheter segment. Following inoculation of donor skin with 6 log cfu of MRSA, none was detected after 24 h. Chlorhexidine was released from the gel after a lag time of 30 min and increasing amounts were detected on the donor skin surface over the 48 h test period. The CHG gel dressing retained its antimicrobial activity on the artificial skin for 7 days. Conclusions: The CHG intravascular catheter site gel dressing had detectable antimicrobial activity for up to 7 days, which should suppress bacterial growth on the skin at the catheter insertion site, thereby reducing the risk of infection.

KW - Antisepsis

KW - Catheter-related infections

KW - Ex vivo

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JF - Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

SN - 0305-7453

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