Applying 3D Scanning and Modeling in Transport Design Education

Ertu Unver, Paul Atkinson, Dave Tancock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advanced 3D Laser Scanning processes have developed over the last decade and are now available and affordable for medium to large companies as well as education. This study examines the overall efficiency of the 3D scanning process and potential value for use in design education. The potential effectiveness of the 3D laser technology for education is also assessed with live projects. This article explores a reverse engineering approach for product form design. Three-dimensional models of design concepts are created in clay, and data points on the surface of the model are then measured using a non-contact 3D scan device. The resulting data is then imported into an appropriate CAD design package for further design development.

LanguageEnglish
Pages41-48
Number of pages8
JournalComputer-Aided Design and Applications
Volume3
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Scanning
Education
Modeling
Product Form
Laser Scanning
Lasers
Reverse engineering
Reverse Engineering
Non-contact
Computer aided design
Clay
Design
Laser
Three-dimensional
Model
Industry

Cite this

Unver, Ertu ; Atkinson, Paul ; Tancock, Dave. / Applying 3D Scanning and Modeling in Transport Design Education. In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications. 2006 ; Vol. 3, No. 1-4. pp. 41-48.
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Applying 3D Scanning and Modeling in Transport Design Education. / Unver, Ertu; Atkinson, Paul; Tancock, Dave.

In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, Vol. 3, No. 1-4, 2006, p. 41-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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