Are mental health nurses natural smoking cessation practitioners?: Harriet Burgess and colleagues consider the issues surrounding smoking cessation strategies for people with mental health problems

Harriet Burgess, Joanne Marie Ford, Sarah Kendal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People who have mental health problems have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population in the UK and they are particularly vulnerable to smoking and smoking-related diseases. It is important that nurses working with these service users help them to stop smoking as part of their holistic care. Mental health nurses often have person-centred therapy skills and have the opportunity to use motivational interviewing which could help clients to consider change. However, nurses may be ambivalent about whether smoking cessation is desirable in these circumstances and prefer to prioritise mental health. Appropriate education and training should be provided so that nurses can routinely apply their skills and knowledge to support smoking cessation. In this article it is also argued that nurses should address their own attitudes to smoking, particularly if they are smokers themselves.

LanguageEnglish
Pages34-37
Number of pages4
JournalMental Health Practice
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Mental Health
Nurses
Smoking
Motivational Interviewing
Morbidity
Education
Mortality
Population

Cite this

@article{9c8cfb961cc4494c8b86f5a8a7a1b1fd,
title = "Are mental health nurses natural smoking cessation practitioners?: Harriet Burgess and colleagues consider the issues surrounding smoking cessation strategies for people with mental health problems",
abstract = "People who have mental health problems have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population in the UK and they are particularly vulnerable to smoking and smoking-related diseases. It is important that nurses working with these service users help them to stop smoking as part of their holistic care. Mental health nurses often have person-centred therapy skills and have the opportunity to use motivational interviewing which could help clients to consider change. However, nurses may be ambivalent about whether smoking cessation is desirable in these circumstances and prefer to prioritise mental health. Appropriate education and training should be provided so that nurses can routinely apply their skills and knowledge to support smoking cessation. In this article it is also argued that nurses should address their own attitudes to smoking, particularly if they are smokers themselves.",
keywords = "Health promotion, Mental health, Smoking cessation",
author = "Harriet Burgess and Ford, {Joanne Marie} and Sarah Kendal",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "11",
doi = "10.7748/mhp.19.3.34.s19",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "34--37",
journal = "Mental Health Practice",
issn = "1465-8720",
publisher = "RCN Publishing",
number = "3",

}

Are mental health nurses natural smoking cessation practitioners? Harriet Burgess and colleagues consider the issues surrounding smoking cessation strategies for people with mental health problems. / Burgess, Harriet; Ford, Joanne Marie; Kendal, Sarah.

In: Mental Health Practice, Vol. 19, No. 3, 11.11.2015, p. 34-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are mental health nurses natural smoking cessation practitioners?

T2 - Mental Health Practice

AU - Burgess, Harriet

AU - Ford, Joanne Marie

AU - Kendal, Sarah

PY - 2015/11/11

Y1 - 2015/11/11

N2 - People who have mental health problems have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population in the UK and they are particularly vulnerable to smoking and smoking-related diseases. It is important that nurses working with these service users help them to stop smoking as part of their holistic care. Mental health nurses often have person-centred therapy skills and have the opportunity to use motivational interviewing which could help clients to consider change. However, nurses may be ambivalent about whether smoking cessation is desirable in these circumstances and prefer to prioritise mental health. Appropriate education and training should be provided so that nurses can routinely apply their skills and knowledge to support smoking cessation. In this article it is also argued that nurses should address their own attitudes to smoking, particularly if they are smokers themselves.

AB - People who have mental health problems have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population in the UK and they are particularly vulnerable to smoking and smoking-related diseases. It is important that nurses working with these service users help them to stop smoking as part of their holistic care. Mental health nurses often have person-centred therapy skills and have the opportunity to use motivational interviewing which could help clients to consider change. However, nurses may be ambivalent about whether smoking cessation is desirable in these circumstances and prefer to prioritise mental health. Appropriate education and training should be provided so that nurses can routinely apply their skills and knowledge to support smoking cessation. In this article it is also argued that nurses should address their own attitudes to smoking, particularly if they are smokers themselves.

KW - Health promotion

KW - Mental health

KW - Smoking cessation

U2 - 10.7748/mhp.19.3.34.s19

DO - 10.7748/mhp.19.3.34.s19

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 34

EP - 37

JO - Mental Health Practice

JF - Mental Health Practice

SN - 1465-8720

IS - 3

ER -