Beyond "East" and "West" through The Eternal Network

Networked Artists’ Communities as Counter-publics of Cold War Europe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter considers how networked communities of post avant-garde artists in the Cold War period reconceptualised frontiers of mind and territory named “East” and “West”, particularly in Europe. Positioning the launch of Sputnik 1 as a paradigm shift in planetary consciousness and telecommunications, Roddy Hunter takes Robert Filliou’s 1968 conception of The Eternal Network as an emblematic post avant-garde response of working in distributed collaboration across the former East/West divide. The analyses of chosen examples will consider whether artists’ attempts to work through horizontal, distributive networks arguably constituted a “second public sphere” anticipating peer-to-peer networks of now ubiquitous globalisation.

In memory of Norbert Klassen (1941–2011)

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPerformance Art in the Second Public Sphere
Subtitle of host publicationEvent-based Art in Late Socialist Europe
EditorsKatalin Cseh-Varga, Adam Czirak
Place of PublicationAbingdon and New York
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter1
Pages19-31
Number of pages13
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781315193106
ISBN (Print)9781138723276
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes
EventPerforming Arts in the Second Public Sphere - Literaturwerkstatt , Berlin, Germany
Duration: 9 May 201411 May 2014
http://www.2ndpublic.org/news/2014/04/conference-performing-art-in-the-second-public-sphere

Publication series

NameRoutledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies
PublisherRoutledge

Conference

ConferencePerforming Arts in the Second Public Sphere
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period9/05/1411/05/14
Internet address

Fingerprint

Peer to peer networks
Cold War
Counterpublics
Artist Community
Eternal
Artist
Peers

Cite this

Hunter, R. (2018). Beyond "East" and "West" through The Eternal Network: Networked Artists’ Communities as Counter-publics of Cold War Europe. In K. Cseh-Varga, & A. Czirak (Eds.), Performance Art in the Second Public Sphere: Event-based Art in Late Socialist Europe (1st ed., pp. 19-31). (Routledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies). Abingdon and New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315193106-2
Hunter, Roddy. / Beyond "East" and "West" through The Eternal Network : Networked Artists’ Communities as Counter-publics of Cold War Europe. Performance Art in the Second Public Sphere: Event-based Art in Late Socialist Europe. editor / Katalin Cseh-Varga ; Adam Czirak. 1st. ed. Abingdon and New York : Routledge, 2018. pp. 19-31 (Routledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies).
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Hunter, R 2018, Beyond "East" and "West" through The Eternal Network: Networked Artists’ Communities as Counter-publics of Cold War Europe. in K Cseh-Varga & A Czirak (eds), Performance Art in the Second Public Sphere: Event-based Art in Late Socialist Europe. 1st edn, Routledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies, Routledge, Abingdon and New York, pp. 19-31, Performing Arts in the Second Public Sphere, Berlin, Germany, 9/05/14. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315193106-2

Beyond "East" and "West" through The Eternal Network : Networked Artists’ Communities as Counter-publics of Cold War Europe. / Hunter, Roddy.

Performance Art in the Second Public Sphere: Event-based Art in Late Socialist Europe. ed. / Katalin Cseh-Varga; Adam Czirak. 1st. ed. Abingdon and New York : Routledge, 2018. p. 19-31 (Routledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Hunter R. Beyond "East" and "West" through The Eternal Network: Networked Artists’ Communities as Counter-publics of Cold War Europe. In Cseh-Varga K, Czirak A, editors, Performance Art in the Second Public Sphere: Event-based Art in Late Socialist Europe. 1st ed. Abingdon and New York: Routledge. 2018. p. 19-31. (Routledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315193106-2