Bringing in the Customers

Regulation, Discretion and Customer Service Narratives in Upmarket Hair Salons

Tracey Yeadon-Lee, Nick Jewson, Alan Felstead, Alison Fuller, Lorna Unwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the work of UK hair stylists in ‘up-market’ hairdressing salons and examines the connection between the organisation of work and customer service narratives within these salon environments. Drawing on qualitative empirical research, the paper discusses how tensions, generated through managerial regulation and the concomitant requirement for stylists to exercise task discretion, are ultimately reconciled through customer service narratives. The paper argues that while the narratives achieve this by operating as a form of normative regulation in the salons, whereby the work practices of stylists are shaped in line with organisational goals and objectives, they also function as resources for stylists through which they can further their economic and occupational self-interests.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-114
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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customer
regulation
narrative
organizational goal
empirical research
market
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economics

Cite this

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Bringing in the Customers : Regulation, Discretion and Customer Service Narratives in Upmarket Hair Salons. / Yeadon-Lee, Tracey; Jewson, Nick; Felstead, Alan; Fuller, Alison ; Unwin, Lorna.

In: International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies, Vol. 6 , No. 3, 2011, p. 101-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Felstead, Alan

AU - Fuller, Alison

AU - Unwin, Lorna

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