Can Diet Help Non-Obese Individuals with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Subjects diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or hepatic steatosis are usually obese or overweight. NAFLD has also been reported in many non-obese healthy subjects as an incidental finding during imaging. Subjects with early-stage NAFLD who are otherwise healthy are often left unmanaged in current clinical practice; it is not clear if an early intervention in those individuals would be of any benefit in preventing NAFLD progression to more serious conditions. Since many of these subjects are non-alcoholic and have a normal body mass index (BMI), an intensive lifestyle change program is not usually recommended. This report presents an otherwise healthy non-alcoholic subject with incidental NAFLD having a normal BMI and a waist circumference below 90 cm who successfully reversed his condition by undertaking a lifestyle intervention. The case report is expected to encourage large cohort studies to substantiate the benefits of dietary interventions in alleviating hepatic steatosis among non-obese individuals.
LanguageEnglish
Article number88
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Sep 2017

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Diet
Life Style
Body Mass Index
Incidental Findings
Liver
Waist Circumference
Disease Progression
Healthy Volunteers
Cohort Studies
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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title = "Can Diet Help Non-Obese Individuals with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)?",
abstract = "Subjects diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or hepatic steatosis are usually obese or overweight. NAFLD has also been reported in many non-obese healthy subjects as an incidental finding during imaging. Subjects with early-stage NAFLD who are otherwise healthy are often left unmanaged in current clinical practice; it is not clear if an early intervention in those individuals would be of any benefit in preventing NAFLD progression to more serious conditions. Since many of these subjects are non-alcoholic and have a normal body mass index (BMI), an intensive lifestyle change program is not usually recommended. This report presents an otherwise healthy non-alcoholic subject with incidental NAFLD having a normal BMI and a waist circumference below 90 cm who successfully reversed his condition by undertaking a lifestyle intervention. The case report is expected to encourage large cohort studies to substantiate the benefits of dietary interventions in alleviating hepatic steatosis among non-obese individuals.",
keywords = "Diabetes risk, Insulin resistance, Fatty liver disease, Hyperinsulinemia, NAFLD, NASH, Intensive lifestyle change program",
author = "Hamid Merchant",
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day = "19",
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Can Diet Help Non-Obese Individuals with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)? / Merchant, Hamid.

In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 9, 88, 19.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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PY - 2017/9/19

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AB - Subjects diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or hepatic steatosis are usually obese or overweight. NAFLD has also been reported in many non-obese healthy subjects as an incidental finding during imaging. Subjects with early-stage NAFLD who are otherwise healthy are often left unmanaged in current clinical practice; it is not clear if an early intervention in those individuals would be of any benefit in preventing NAFLD progression to more serious conditions. Since many of these subjects are non-alcoholic and have a normal body mass index (BMI), an intensive lifestyle change program is not usually recommended. This report presents an otherwise healthy non-alcoholic subject with incidental NAFLD having a normal BMI and a waist circumference below 90 cm who successfully reversed his condition by undertaking a lifestyle intervention. The case report is expected to encourage large cohort studies to substantiate the benefits of dietary interventions in alleviating hepatic steatosis among non-obese individuals.

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