Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination?

O. Assadian, D. J. Leaper, Axel Kramer, K. J. Ousey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Few studies have explored the microbial contamination of glove boxes in clinical settings. The objective of this observational study was to investigate whether a new glove packaging system in which single gloves are dispensed vertically, cuff end first, has lower levels of contamination on the gloves and on the surface around the box aperture compared with conventional glove boxes. Methods Seven participating sites were provided with vertical glove dispensing systems (modified boxes) and conventional boxes. Before opening glove boxes, the surface around the aperture was sampled microbiologically to establish baseline levels of superficial contamination. Once the glove boxes were opened, the first pair of gloves in each box was sampled for viable bacteria. Thereafter, testing sites were visited on a weekly basis over a period of six weeks and the same microbiological assessments were made. Results The surface near the aperture of the modified boxes became significantly less contaminated over time compared with the conventional boxes (P<0.001), with an average of 46.7% less contamination around the aperture. Overall, gloves from modified boxes showed significantly less colony-forming unit contamination than gloves from conventional boxes (P<0.001). Comparing all sites over the entire six-week period, gloves from modified boxes had 88.9% less bacterial contamination. Conclusion This simple improvement to glove box design reduces contamination of unused gloves. Such modifications could decrease the risk of microbial cross-transmission in settings that use gloves. However, such advantages do not substitute for strict hand hygiene compliance and appropriate use of non-sterile, single-use gloves.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-262
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume94
Issue number3
Early online date15 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

Fingerprint

Hand Hygiene
Product Packaging
Observational Studies
Stem Cells
Bacteria

Cite this

Assadian, O. ; Leaper, D. J. ; Kramer, Axel ; Ousey, K. J. / Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination?. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2016 ; Vol. 94, No. 3. pp. 259-262.
@article{15b5e3c6b7c44f7aa5dd9f30c593407d,
title = "Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination?",
abstract = "Background Few studies have explored the microbial contamination of glove boxes in clinical settings. The objective of this observational study was to investigate whether a new glove packaging system in which single gloves are dispensed vertically, cuff end first, has lower levels of contamination on the gloves and on the surface around the box aperture compared with conventional glove boxes. Methods Seven participating sites were provided with vertical glove dispensing systems (modified boxes) and conventional boxes. Before opening glove boxes, the surface around the aperture was sampled microbiologically to establish baseline levels of superficial contamination. Once the glove boxes were opened, the first pair of gloves in each box was sampled for viable bacteria. Thereafter, testing sites were visited on a weekly basis over a period of six weeks and the same microbiological assessments were made. Results The surface near the aperture of the modified boxes became significantly less contaminated over time compared with the conventional boxes (P<0.001), with an average of 46.7{\%} less contamination around the aperture. Overall, gloves from modified boxes showed significantly less colony-forming unit contamination than gloves from conventional boxes (P<0.001). Comparing all sites over the entire six-week period, gloves from modified boxes had 88.9{\%} less bacterial contamination. Conclusion This simple improvement to glove box design reduces contamination of unused gloves. Such modifications could decrease the risk of microbial cross-transmission in settings that use gloves. However, such advantages do not substitute for strict hand hygiene compliance and appropriate use of non-sterile, single-use gloves.",
keywords = "Bacteria, Contamination, Dispenser, Disposable gloves, Glove box, Nosocomial infection, Nosocomial pathogens",
author = "O. Assadian and Leaper, {D. J.} and Axel Kramer and Ousey, {K. J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhin.2016.09.005",
language = "English",
volume = "94",
pages = "259--262",
journal = "Journal of Hospital Infection",
issn = "0195-6701",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "3",

}

Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination? / Assadian, O.; Leaper, D. J.; Kramer, Axel; Ousey, K. J.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 94, No. 3, 11.2016, p. 259-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination?

AU - Assadian, O.

AU - Leaper, D. J.

AU - Kramer, Axel

AU - Ousey, K. J.

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - Background Few studies have explored the microbial contamination of glove boxes in clinical settings. The objective of this observational study was to investigate whether a new glove packaging system in which single gloves are dispensed vertically, cuff end first, has lower levels of contamination on the gloves and on the surface around the box aperture compared with conventional glove boxes. Methods Seven participating sites were provided with vertical glove dispensing systems (modified boxes) and conventional boxes. Before opening glove boxes, the surface around the aperture was sampled microbiologically to establish baseline levels of superficial contamination. Once the glove boxes were opened, the first pair of gloves in each box was sampled for viable bacteria. Thereafter, testing sites were visited on a weekly basis over a period of six weeks and the same microbiological assessments were made. Results The surface near the aperture of the modified boxes became significantly less contaminated over time compared with the conventional boxes (P<0.001), with an average of 46.7% less contamination around the aperture. Overall, gloves from modified boxes showed significantly less colony-forming unit contamination than gloves from conventional boxes (P<0.001). Comparing all sites over the entire six-week period, gloves from modified boxes had 88.9% less bacterial contamination. Conclusion This simple improvement to glove box design reduces contamination of unused gloves. Such modifications could decrease the risk of microbial cross-transmission in settings that use gloves. However, such advantages do not substitute for strict hand hygiene compliance and appropriate use of non-sterile, single-use gloves.

AB - Background Few studies have explored the microbial contamination of glove boxes in clinical settings. The objective of this observational study was to investigate whether a new glove packaging system in which single gloves are dispensed vertically, cuff end first, has lower levels of contamination on the gloves and on the surface around the box aperture compared with conventional glove boxes. Methods Seven participating sites were provided with vertical glove dispensing systems (modified boxes) and conventional boxes. Before opening glove boxes, the surface around the aperture was sampled microbiologically to establish baseline levels of superficial contamination. Once the glove boxes were opened, the first pair of gloves in each box was sampled for viable bacteria. Thereafter, testing sites were visited on a weekly basis over a period of six weeks and the same microbiological assessments were made. Results The surface near the aperture of the modified boxes became significantly less contaminated over time compared with the conventional boxes (P<0.001), with an average of 46.7% less contamination around the aperture. Overall, gloves from modified boxes showed significantly less colony-forming unit contamination than gloves from conventional boxes (P<0.001). Comparing all sites over the entire six-week period, gloves from modified boxes had 88.9% less bacterial contamination. Conclusion This simple improvement to glove box design reduces contamination of unused gloves. Such modifications could decrease the risk of microbial cross-transmission in settings that use gloves. However, such advantages do not substitute for strict hand hygiene compliance and appropriate use of non-sterile, single-use gloves.

KW - Bacteria

KW - Contamination

KW - Dispenser

KW - Disposable gloves

KW - Glove box

KW - Nosocomial infection

KW - Nosocomial pathogens

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994784769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhin.2016.09.005

DO - 10.1016/j.jhin.2016.09.005

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 259

EP - 262

JO - Journal of Hospital Infection

JF - Journal of Hospital Infection

SN - 0195-6701

IS - 3

ER -