Can the Unconscious Boost Lie-Detection Accuracy?

Chris N. H. Street, Miguel A. Vadillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, a variety of methods have been used to show that unconscious processes can boost lie-detection accuracy. This article considers the latest developments in the context of research into unconscious cognition. Unconscious cognition has been under attack in recent years because the findings do not replicate, and when they do show reliably improved performance, they fail to exclude the possibility that conscious processing is at work. Here we show that work into unconscious lie detection suffers from the same weaknesses. Future research would benefit from taking a stronger theoretical stance and explicitly attempting to exclude conscious-processing accounts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-250
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

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Lie Detection
Cognition
Unconscious (Psychology)
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Cite this

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Can the Unconscious Boost Lie-Detection Accuracy? / Street, Chris N. H.; Vadillo, Miguel A.

In: Current Directions in Psychological Science, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 246-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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