Challenges in Creating a Disaster Resilient Built Environment

Dilanthi Amaratunga, Richard Haigh, Chamindi Malalgoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With the increase in occurrences of high impact disasters, the concept of risk reduction and resilience is widely recognised. Recent disasters have highlighted the exposure of urban cities to natural disasters and emphasised the need of making cities resilient to disasters. Built environment plays an important role in every city and need to be functional and operational at a time of a disaster and is expected to provide protection to people and other facilities. However, recent disasters have highlighted the vulnerability of the built assets to natural disasters and therefore it is very much important to focus on creating a disaster resilient built environment within cities. However the process of making a disaster resilient built environment is a complex process where many challenges are involved. Accordingly the paper aims at exploring the challenges involved in building a disaster resilient built environment. Paper discusses the findings of some expert interviews and three case studies which have been conducted in Sri Lanka by selecting three cities which are potentially vulnerable to threats posed by natural hazards. The empirical evidence revealed, lack of regulatory frameworks; unplanned cities and urbanisation; old building stocks and at risk infrastructure; unauthorised structures; institutional arrangements; inadequate capacities of municipal councils; lack of funding; inadequacy of qualified human resources; and corruption and unlawful activities as major challenges for creating a disaster resilient built environment within Sri Lankan cities. The paper proposes a set of recommendations to address these prevailing concerns and to build a more resilient built environment within cities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)736-744
Number of pages9
JournalProcedia Economics and Finance
Volume18
Early online date30 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event4th International Conference on Building Resilience - Salford Quays, Manchester, United Kingdom
Duration: 8 Sep 201411 Sep 2014
Conference number: 4

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disaster
natural disaster
built environment
city
regulatory framework
corruption
natural hazard
human resource
urbanization
vulnerability
infrastructure

Cite this

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title = "Challenges in Creating a Disaster Resilient Built Environment",
abstract = "With the increase in occurrences of high impact disasters, the concept of risk reduction and resilience is widely recognised. Recent disasters have highlighted the exposure of urban cities to natural disasters and emphasised the need of making cities resilient to disasters. Built environment plays an important role in every city and need to be functional and operational at a time of a disaster and is expected to provide protection to people and other facilities. However, recent disasters have highlighted the vulnerability of the built assets to natural disasters and therefore it is very much important to focus on creating a disaster resilient built environment within cities. However the process of making a disaster resilient built environment is a complex process where many challenges are involved. Accordingly the paper aims at exploring the challenges involved in building a disaster resilient built environment. Paper discusses the findings of some expert interviews and three case studies which have been conducted in Sri Lanka by selecting three cities which are potentially vulnerable to threats posed by natural hazards. The empirical evidence revealed, lack of regulatory frameworks; unplanned cities and urbanisation; old building stocks and at risk infrastructure; unauthorised structures; institutional arrangements; inadequate capacities of municipal councils; lack of funding; inadequacy of qualified human resources; and corruption and unlawful activities as major challenges for creating a disaster resilient built environment within Sri Lankan cities. The paper proposes a set of recommendations to address these prevailing concerns and to build a more resilient built environment within cities.",
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Challenges in Creating a Disaster Resilient Built Environment. / Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard; Malalgoda, Chamindi.

In: Procedia Economics and Finance, Vol. 18, 2014, p. 736-744.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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