Characterizing dispersion and long term stability of concentrated carbon nanotube aqueous suspensions for fabricating ductile cementitious composites

Shama Parveen, Sohel Rana, Raul Fangueiro, M. C. Paiva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports a systematic attempt of preparing concentrated aqueous suspensions (up to 0.3 wt.%) of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using Pluronic F-127 for developing ductile cementitious composites. Single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes, both pristine and functionalized, were dispersed in water using a short (1 h) and medium energy (80 W) ultrasonication process using pluronic at high concentrations (above critical micelle concentration, 1–5 wt.%) and also using sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) for comparison purpose. The CNT suspensions were characterized for agglomerate area, particle size, zeta potential, extractability and long-term storage stability for a period over 4 years. The optimum suspensions were used to fabricate cementitious composites and their fracture behavior was characterized. Experimental results suggested that the optimum pluronic concentrations (1% for 0.1% CNT, 5% for 0.2% and 0.3% CNT, all in weight percent) provided highly homogeneous CNT dispersion with very low area of agglomerates. The best dispersion quality was obtained with f-SWCNT/pluronic system, which provided very low agglomerate area (< 0.5%), lower CNT bundle size, good quantity of well dispersed nanotubes (up to 50%) and excellent long term storage stability. Cementitious composites fabricated using SWCNT and f-SWCNT suspensions showed ductile fracture behavior and improvement in fracture energy up to 164%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPowder Technology
Volume307
Early online date14 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Characterizing dispersion and long term stability of concentrated carbon nanotube aqueous suspensions for fabricating ductile cementitious composites'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this