Cholesterol homeostasis

links to hair follicle biology and hair disorders

Megan A Palmer, Liam Blakeborough, Matthew Harries, Iain S Haslam

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Lipids and lipid metabolism are critical factors in hair follicle (HF) biology, and cholesterol has long been suspected of influencing hair growth. Altered cholesterol homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of primary cicatricial alopecia, mutations in a cholesterol transporter are associated with congenital hypertrichosis, and dyslipidaemia has been linked to androgenic alopecia. The underlying molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol influences pathways involved in proliferation and differentiation within HF cell populations remain largely unknown. As such, expanding our knowledge of the role for cholesterol in regulating these processes is likely to provide new leads in the development of treatments for disorders of hair growth and cycling. This review describes the current state of knowledge with respect to cholesterol homeostasis in the HF along with known and putative links to hair pathologies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalExperimental Dermatology
Early online date1 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Hair Follicle
Homeostasis
Cholesterol
Alopecia
Hypertrichosis
Growth Disorders
Pathology
Dyslipidemias
Lipid Metabolism
Cells
Lipids
Mutation
Growth
Population

Cite this

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title = "Cholesterol homeostasis: links to hair follicle biology and hair disorders",
abstract = "Lipids and lipid metabolism are critical factors in hair follicle (HF) biology, and cholesterol has long been suspected of influencing hair growth. Altered cholesterol homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of primary cicatricial alopecia, mutations in a cholesterol transporter are associated with congenital hypertrichosis, and dyslipidaemia has been linked to androgenic alopecia. The underlying molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol influences pathways involved in proliferation and differentiation within HF cell populations remain largely unknown. As such, expanding our knowledge of the role for cholesterol in regulating these processes is likely to provide new leads in the development of treatments for disorders of hair growth and cycling. This review describes the current state of knowledge with respect to cholesterol homeostasis in the HF along with known and putative links to hair pathologies.",
keywords = "alopecia, cholesterol, hair follicle, hypertrichosis, transporters",
author = "Palmer, {Megan A} and Liam Blakeborough and Matthew Harries and Haslam, {Iain S}",
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Cholesterol homeostasis : links to hair follicle biology and hair disorders. / Palmer, Megan A; Blakeborough, Liam; Harries, Matthew; Haslam, Iain S.

In: Experimental Dermatology, 01.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cholesterol homeostasis

T2 - links to hair follicle biology and hair disorders

AU - Palmer, Megan A

AU - Blakeborough, Liam

AU - Harries, Matthew

AU - Haslam, Iain S

N1 - © 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Lipids and lipid metabolism are critical factors in hair follicle (HF) biology, and cholesterol has long been suspected of influencing hair growth. Altered cholesterol homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of primary cicatricial alopecia, mutations in a cholesterol transporter are associated with congenital hypertrichosis, and dyslipidaemia has been linked to androgenic alopecia. The underlying molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol influences pathways involved in proliferation and differentiation within HF cell populations remain largely unknown. As such, expanding our knowledge of the role for cholesterol in regulating these processes is likely to provide new leads in the development of treatments for disorders of hair growth and cycling. This review describes the current state of knowledge with respect to cholesterol homeostasis in the HF along with known and putative links to hair pathologies.

AB - Lipids and lipid metabolism are critical factors in hair follicle (HF) biology, and cholesterol has long been suspected of influencing hair growth. Altered cholesterol homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of primary cicatricial alopecia, mutations in a cholesterol transporter are associated with congenital hypertrichosis, and dyslipidaemia has been linked to androgenic alopecia. The underlying molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol influences pathways involved in proliferation and differentiation within HF cell populations remain largely unknown. As such, expanding our knowledge of the role for cholesterol in regulating these processes is likely to provide new leads in the development of treatments for disorders of hair growth and cycling. This review describes the current state of knowledge with respect to cholesterol homeostasis in the HF along with known and putative links to hair pathologies.

KW - alopecia

KW - cholesterol

KW - hair follicle

KW - hypertrichosis

KW - transporters

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