Clinician knowledge of incontinence-associated dermatitis: A multisite survey of healthcare professionals in acute and sub-acute settings

Michelle Barakat-Johnson, John Stephenson, Shifa Basjarahil, Jayne Campbell, Michellle Cunich, Gary Disher, Samara Geering, Natalie Ko, Michelle Lai, Catherine Leahy, Thomas Leong, Eve McClure, Melissa O'Grady, Joan Walsh, Kate White, Fiona Coyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE:
Clinicians’ knowledge of the prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) plays an important role in the clinical care and health outcomes of patients with incontinence. This study aimed to examine clinicians’ knowledge of IAD using the Barakat-Johnson Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis Knowledge Tool (KnowIAD).
DESIGN:
A cross-sectional multicentre survey was conducted from November 2019 to January 2020. The KnowIAD, an 18-item validated instrument that measures knowledge of IAD in the domains: etiology and risk, classification and diagnosis, and prevention and management, was administered to a cross-section of eligible clinicians.
SUBJECTS AND SETTING:
The setting was six hospitals across five health districts across New South Wales, Australia. Participants were nurses (registered nurses, enrolled nurses, assistants in nursing), doctors, allied health professionals (occupational therapists, dietitians, physiotherapists) and students (nursing and allied health).
METHODS:
Participants anonymously completed hard copy surveys and consent was implied upon receipt of a completed survey. Descriptive and exploratory analyses were conducted to quantify clinicians’ knowledge about the etiology and risk, classification and diagnosis, and prevention and management of IAD. A mean knowledge score of 70% was considered to be satisfactory.
RESULTS:
A total of 428 respondents completed the survey. For the etiology and risk domain, 363 respondents (84.8%) obtained a score of ≥70% correct responses. 68 respondents (15.9%) achieved ≥70% correct responses for the classification and diagnosis domain, and; 87 respondents (20.3%) achieved ≥70% correct responses for the prevention and management domain. Overall, 135 respondents (31.5%) achieved ≥70% correct responses for the entire set of items.
CONCLUSION:
Clinicians tend to have low knowledge and recognition of IAD, particularly in the areas of classification and diagnosis, as well as prevention and management, compared with the knowledge of how IAD is caused and the risk factors. Further, this study has identified knowledge gaps for further education which, in turn, will lead to quality-of-life improvements among patients.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 18 Sep 2021

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