Clinician Knowledge of Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis: A Multisite Survey of Healthcare Professionals in Acute and Subacute Settings

Michelle Barakat-Johnson, John Stephenson, Shifa Basjarahil, Jayne Campbell, Michellle Cunich, Gary Disher, Samara Geering, Natalie Ko, Michelle Lai, Catherine Leahy, Thomas Leong, Eve McClure, Melissa O'Grady, Joan Walsh, Kate White, Fiona Coyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE:
This study examined clinicians' knowledge of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) using the Barakat-Johnson Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis Knowledge Tool (Know-IAD).

Design:
A cross-sectional multicenter survey.

SUBJECTS AND SETTING:
The setting was 6 hospitals across 5 health districts in New South Wales, Australia. The participants were nurses (registered nurses and enrolled nurses), physicians, allied health (occupational therapists, dietitians, and physiotherapists), and students (nursing and allied health).

METHODS:
Data about IAD knowledge were collected from November 2019 to January 2020. The Know-IAD, an 18-item validated instrument that measures knowledge of IAD in 3 domains (etiology and risk, classification and diagnosis, and prevention and management), was administered to a cross section of eligible clinicians. The participants anonymously completed hard copy surveys. Descriptive and exploratory analyses were conducted to quantify clinicians' knowledge about the etiology and risk, classification and diagnosis, and prevention and management of IAD. A mean knowledge score of 70% was considered to be satisfactory.

RESULTS:
Four hundred twelve respondents completed the survey. One hundred twenty nine respondents (31.3%) achieved 70% correct responses and greater for the entire set of items. For the etiology and risk domain, 348 respondents (84.5%) obtained a score of 70% correct responses and greater, 67 respondents (16.3%) achieved 70% correct responses and greater for the classification and diagnosis domain, and 84 respondents (20.4%) achieved 70% correct responses and greater for the prevention and management domain.

CONCLUSION:
Clinicians tend to have low knowledge and recognition of IAD, particularly in the areas of classification and diagnosis along with prevention and management. They tend to have higher knowledge of how IAD is caused and the risk factors. This study has identified knowledge gaps for further education that can improve assessment, prevention, and management of IAD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-167
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2022

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