Compassionate wound care: An integrated intervention for people who self-injure

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

This article discusses how an integrated physical, psychological and social approach to wound care can help improve the quality of life for people who self-injure. The health professional should demonstrate compassion while teaching the person who self-injures how to provide their own wound care. Compassionate care may help the patient improve their self-compassion and reduce shame associated with this coping strategy, which may in turn avoid exacerbating self-harm when seeking healthcare.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)616-620
Number of pages5
JournalNursePrescribing
Volume16
Issue number12
Early online date10 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2018

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Shame
Wounds and Injuries
Teaching
Quality of Life
Psychology
Delivery of Health Care
Health

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title = "Compassionate wound care: An integrated intervention for people who self-injure",
abstract = "This article discusses how an integrated physical, psychological and social approach to wound care can help improve the quality of life for people who self-injure. The health professional should demonstrate compassion while teaching the person who self-injures how to provide their own wound care. Compassionate care may help the patient improve their self-compassion and reduce shame associated with this coping strategy, which may in turn avoid exacerbating self-harm when seeking healthcare.",
author = "Gill Rayner and Joanna Blackburn and Karen Ousey",
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}

Compassionate wound care : An integrated intervention for people who self-injure. / Rayner, Gill; Blackburn, Joanna; Ousey, Karen.

In: NursePrescribing, Vol. 16, No. 12, 20.12.2018, p. 616-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Blackburn, Joanna

AU - Ousey, Karen

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AB - This article discusses how an integrated physical, psychological and social approach to wound care can help improve the quality of life for people who self-injure. The health professional should demonstrate compassion while teaching the person who self-injures how to provide their own wound care. Compassionate care may help the patient improve their self-compassion and reduce shame associated with this coping strategy, which may in turn avoid exacerbating self-harm when seeking healthcare.

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