Connecting to Smart Cities

Analyzing Energy Times Series to Visualize Monthly Electricity Peak Load in Residential Buildings

Shamaila Iram, Terrence Fernando, Richard Hill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Rapidly growing energy consumption rate is considered an alarming threat to economic stability and environmental sustainability. There is an urgent need of proposing novel solutions to mitigate the drastic impact of increased energy demand in urban cities to improve energy efficiency in smart buildings. It is commonly agreed that exploring, analyzing and visualizing energy consumption patterns in residential buildings can help to estimate their energy demands. Moreover, visualizing energy consumption patterns of residential buildings can also help to diagnose if there is any unpredictable increase in energy demand at a certain time period. However, visualizing and inferring energy consumption patterns from typical line graphs, bar charts, scatter plots is obsolete, less informative and do not provide deep and significant insight of the daily domestic demand of energy utilization. Moreover, these methods become less significant when high temporal resolution is required. In this research work, advanced data exploratory and data analytics techniques are applied on energy time series. Data exploration results are presented in the form of heatmap. Heatmap provides a significant insight of energy utilization behavior during different times of the day. Heatmap results are articulated from three analytical perspectives; descriptive analysis, diagnostic analysis and contextual analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018
EditorsKohei Arai, Rahul Bhatia, Supriya Kapoor
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages333-342
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9783030026868
ISBN (Print)9783030026851
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2018
EventFuture Technologies Conference - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 13 Nov 201814 Nov 2018
http://saiconference.com/FTC (Link to Conference Website)

Publication series

Name Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Electronic)2194-5357

Conference

ConferenceFuture Technologies Conference
Abbreviated titleFTC 2018
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period13/11/1814/11/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Time series
Energy utilization
Electricity
Intelligent buildings
Energy efficiency
Smart city
Sustainable development
Economics

Cite this

Iram, S., Fernando, T., & Hill, R. (2018). Connecting to Smart Cities: Analyzing Energy Times Series to Visualize Monthly Electricity Peak Load in Residential Buildings. In K. Arai, R. Bhatia, & S. Kapoor (Eds.), Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018 (pp. 333-342). ( Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02686-8_26
Iram, Shamaila ; Fernando, Terrence ; Hill, Richard. / Connecting to Smart Cities : Analyzing Energy Times Series to Visualize Monthly Electricity Peak Load in Residential Buildings. Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018. editor / Kohei Arai ; Rahul Bhatia ; Supriya Kapoor. Springer Verlag, 2018. pp. 333-342 ( Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing).
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abstract = "Rapidly growing energy consumption rate is considered an alarming threat to economic stability and environmental sustainability. There is an urgent need of proposing novel solutions to mitigate the drastic impact of increased energy demand in urban cities to improve energy efficiency in smart buildings. It is commonly agreed that exploring, analyzing and visualizing energy consumption patterns in residential buildings can help to estimate their energy demands. Moreover, visualizing energy consumption patterns of residential buildings can also help to diagnose if there is any unpredictable increase in energy demand at a certain time period. However, visualizing and inferring energy consumption patterns from typical line graphs, bar charts, scatter plots is obsolete, less informative and do not provide deep and significant insight of the daily domestic demand of energy utilization. Moreover, these methods become less significant when high temporal resolution is required. In this research work, advanced data exploratory and data analytics techniques are applied on energy time series. Data exploration results are presented in the form of heatmap. Heatmap provides a significant insight of energy utilization behavior during different times of the day. Heatmap results are articulated from three analytical perspectives; descriptive analysis, diagnostic analysis and contextual analysis.",
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Iram, S, Fernando, T & Hill, R 2018, Connecting to Smart Cities: Analyzing Energy Times Series to Visualize Monthly Electricity Peak Load in Residential Buildings. in K Arai, R Bhatia & S Kapoor (eds), Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, Springer Verlag, pp. 333-342, Future Technologies Conference, Vancouver, Canada, 13/11/18. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02686-8_26

Connecting to Smart Cities : Analyzing Energy Times Series to Visualize Monthly Electricity Peak Load in Residential Buildings. / Iram, Shamaila; Fernando, Terrence; Hill, Richard.

Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018. ed. / Kohei Arai; Rahul Bhatia; Supriya Kapoor. Springer Verlag, 2018. p. 333-342 ( Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Fernando, Terrence

AU - Hill, Richard

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Y1 - 2018/10/18

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Iram S, Fernando T, Hill R. Connecting to Smart Cities: Analyzing Energy Times Series to Visualize Monthly Electricity Peak Load in Residential Buildings. In Arai K, Bhatia R, Kapoor S, editors, Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018. Springer Verlag. 2018. p. 333-342. ( Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02686-8_26