Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Public open spaces in cities are considered as an asset for making cities sustainable from all its’ three counts; economic, social and environmental. Yet, the importance of public open spaces for disaster resilience is less recognised and still remains under-rehearsed in urban planning context. Within this context, this research explores the potentials of public open spaces as a mean to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis through planning and designing interventions. Further, this research is focused down to the Sri Lankan context, as Sri Lanka is one of the Tsunami prone countries fronting many challenges such as land scarcity due to the rapid urbanization, challenges to the natural and built environment due to the unplanned urban development.
This paper is based on the part of the findings of a doctoral study. The doctoral study adopted the grounded theory method as the research strategy. Accordingly, data collection involved 72 unstructured interviews covering wide variety of participants related to the field of study in the context of Sri Lanka; Tsunami affected communities, disaster resilience experts, urban planners, sociologists and coastal planners, etc. The coding procedure of grounded theory is used to analyse the transcripts, notes, maps and documents related to the interviews conducted.
The analysis reveals that there is a significant potential to use public open spaces to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis as an emergency evacuation directing point, as a primary place for emergency rescue, as an agent for temporary sheltering, as a facilitator for Tsunami disaster mitigation and as a mediator to provide Tsunami awareness. Finally, the findings propose five core principles which can be used to plan and design public open spaces as a strategy to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICSBE 2018
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment
Place of PublicationPeradeniya
PublisherSpringer Singapore
Pages71-78
Number of pages8
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9789555892667
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventThe 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment: Transforming Our Built Environment through Innovation and Integration - Earl's Regency Hotel, Kandy, Sri Lanka
Duration: 13 Dec 201816 Dec 2018
Conference number: 9

Conference

ConferenceThe 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment
CountrySri Lanka
CityKandy
Period13/12/1816/12/18

Fingerprint

public space
open space
tsunami
disaster
city
planning
urban planning
urban development
urbanization
mitigation
economics

Cite this

Jayakody, C., Amaratunga, D., & Haigh, R. (2019). Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis. In ICSBE 2018: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment (Vol. 1, pp. 71-78). Peradeniya: Springer Singapore.
Jayakody, Chathuranganee ; Amaratunga, Dilanthi ; Haigh, Richard. / Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis. ICSBE 2018: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment. Vol. 1 Peradeniya : Springer Singapore, 2019. pp. 71-78
@inproceedings{59d2c2eb11c340b2bf04518fd27dbcff,
title = "Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis",
abstract = "Public open spaces in cities are considered as an asset for making cities sustainable from all its’ three counts; economic, social and environmental. Yet, the importance of public open spaces for disaster resilience is less recognised and still remains under-rehearsed in urban planning context. Within this context, this research explores the potentials of public open spaces as a mean to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis through planning and designing interventions. Further, this research is focused down to the Sri Lankan context, as Sri Lanka is one of the Tsunami prone countries fronting many challenges such as land scarcity due to the rapid urbanization, challenges to the natural and built environment due to the unplanned urban development. This paper is based on the part of the findings of a doctoral study. The doctoral study adopted the grounded theory method as the research strategy. Accordingly, data collection involved 72 unstructured interviews covering wide variety of participants related to the field of study in the context of Sri Lanka; Tsunami affected communities, disaster resilience experts, urban planners, sociologists and coastal planners, etc. The coding procedure of grounded theory is used to analyse the transcripts, notes, maps and documents related to the interviews conducted. The analysis reveals that there is a significant potential to use public open spaces to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis as an emergency evacuation directing point, as a primary place for emergency rescue, as an agent for temporary sheltering, as a facilitator for Tsunami disaster mitigation and as a mediator to provide Tsunami awareness. Finally, the findings propose five core principles which can be used to plan and design public open spaces as a strategy to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis.",
keywords = "Disaster Resilience, Public open spaces, sustainable development, Urban Designing, Urban planning",
author = "Chathuranganee Jayakody and Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "71--78",
booktitle = "ICSBE 2018",
publisher = "Springer Singapore",
address = "Singapore",

}

Jayakody, C, Amaratunga, D & Haigh, R 2019, Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis. in ICSBE 2018: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment. vol. 1, Springer Singapore, Peradeniya, pp. 71-78, The 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment, Kandy, Sri Lanka, 13/12/18.

Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis. / Jayakody, Chathuranganee; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard.

ICSBE 2018: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment. Vol. 1 Peradeniya : Springer Singapore, 2019. p. 71-78.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis

AU - Jayakody, Chathuranganee

AU - Amaratunga, Dilanthi

AU - Haigh, Richard

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Public open spaces in cities are considered as an asset for making cities sustainable from all its’ three counts; economic, social and environmental. Yet, the importance of public open spaces for disaster resilience is less recognised and still remains under-rehearsed in urban planning context. Within this context, this research explores the potentials of public open spaces as a mean to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis through planning and designing interventions. Further, this research is focused down to the Sri Lankan context, as Sri Lanka is one of the Tsunami prone countries fronting many challenges such as land scarcity due to the rapid urbanization, challenges to the natural and built environment due to the unplanned urban development. This paper is based on the part of the findings of a doctoral study. The doctoral study adopted the grounded theory method as the research strategy. Accordingly, data collection involved 72 unstructured interviews covering wide variety of participants related to the field of study in the context of Sri Lanka; Tsunami affected communities, disaster resilience experts, urban planners, sociologists and coastal planners, etc. The coding procedure of grounded theory is used to analyse the transcripts, notes, maps and documents related to the interviews conducted. The analysis reveals that there is a significant potential to use public open spaces to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis as an emergency evacuation directing point, as a primary place for emergency rescue, as an agent for temporary sheltering, as a facilitator for Tsunami disaster mitigation and as a mediator to provide Tsunami awareness. Finally, the findings propose five core principles which can be used to plan and design public open spaces as a strategy to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis.

AB - Public open spaces in cities are considered as an asset for making cities sustainable from all its’ three counts; economic, social and environmental. Yet, the importance of public open spaces for disaster resilience is less recognised and still remains under-rehearsed in urban planning context. Within this context, this research explores the potentials of public open spaces as a mean to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis through planning and designing interventions. Further, this research is focused down to the Sri Lankan context, as Sri Lanka is one of the Tsunami prone countries fronting many challenges such as land scarcity due to the rapid urbanization, challenges to the natural and built environment due to the unplanned urban development. This paper is based on the part of the findings of a doctoral study. The doctoral study adopted the grounded theory method as the research strategy. Accordingly, data collection involved 72 unstructured interviews covering wide variety of participants related to the field of study in the context of Sri Lanka; Tsunami affected communities, disaster resilience experts, urban planners, sociologists and coastal planners, etc. The coding procedure of grounded theory is used to analyse the transcripts, notes, maps and documents related to the interviews conducted. The analysis reveals that there is a significant potential to use public open spaces to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis as an emergency evacuation directing point, as a primary place for emergency rescue, as an agent for temporary sheltering, as a facilitator for Tsunami disaster mitigation and as a mediator to provide Tsunami awareness. Finally, the findings propose five core principles which can be used to plan and design public open spaces as a strategy to enhance the coastal cities’ resilience to Tsunamis.

KW - Disaster Resilience

KW - Public open spaces

KW - sustainable development

KW - Urban Designing

KW - Urban planning

UR - http://www.icsbe.org/icsbe/2018/

M3 - Conference contribution

VL - 1

SP - 71

EP - 78

BT - ICSBE 2018

PB - Springer Singapore

CY - Peradeniya

ER -

Jayakody C, Amaratunga D, Haigh R. Core Principles For Planning Public Open Spaces to Enhance Coastal Cities’ Resilience to Tsunamis. In ICSBE 2018: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment. Vol. 1. Peradeniya: Springer Singapore. 2019. p. 71-78