Current issues in the delivery of complementary therapies in cancer care - Policy, perceptions and expectations

An overview

Dai Roberts, Alison McNulty, Ann Louise Caress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review discusses the current policies, perceptions and expectations around the use of complementary therapies (CTs) in cancer care. Whilst the last two decades have seen a marked increase in the demand for and provision of CTs amongst cancer patients, this has not been matched with an increase in the understanding of their effectiveness or their benefits to cancer patients. The issues discussed highlight the need to understand more fully the benefits of integrated services. Important questions raised here relate to what patients perceive as being the primary benefits/expected outcomes of CTs and how, if at all, they see their relationship with CT practitioners as different from that with "orthodox"; clinicians.The challenge is clearly to find a common ground between "orthodox"; professionals, CT practitioners and patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-123
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume9
Issue number2
Early online date17 May 2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Current issues in the delivery of complementary therapies in cancer care - Policy, perceptions and expectations : An overview. / Roberts, Dai; McNulty, Alison; Caress, Ann Louise.

In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.06.2005, p. 115-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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