Darning, doylies and dancing

The work of the Leeds Association of Girls' Clubs (1904-1913)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Leeds Association of Girls' Clubs (LAGC) was set up by a group of women, including Hilda Hargrove, Dr Lucy Buckley and Mary and Margaret Harvey, to promote collaboration between the city's girls' clubs. The organisation epitomised women working in partnership whilst reflecting their differing philanthropic and political interests. However LAGC's collaborative approach resulted in liberal consensus which downplayed the significance of girls' working conditions. Throughout the decade LAGC's focus was its annual competitions. These featured utilitarian and decorative handicrafts (darning and doylies) enshrining both frugality and aspiration, alongside dance and drill which channelled girls' vigour. Nevertheless, LAGC's resilience resulted in an organisation which is still in existence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-388
Number of pages20
JournalWomen's History Review
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

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Darning, doylies and dancing : The work of the Leeds Association of Girls' Clubs (1904-1913). / Jones, Helen M F.

In: Women's History Review, Vol. 20, No. 3, 07.2011, p. 369-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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