Decentralization and local institutional arrangements for wetland management in Ethiopia and Sierra Leone

Roy Maconachie, Alan B. Dixon, Adrian Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Ethiopia and Sierra Leone, recent social, political and environmental transformations have precipitated the intensification of wetland use, as local people have sought to safeguard and strengthen their livelihoods. Concurrent decentralization policies in both countries have also seen the government strengthen its position at the local level. Drawing upon recent field-based evidence from Ethiopia and Sierra Leone, this paper examines the compatibility between community-based local institutions for wetland use, and the process of decentralization. It argues that decentralization has in fact restricted the development of mature local institutional arrangements, due to its intrinsically political interventionist nature.

LanguageEnglish
Pages269-279
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Geography
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

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Sierra Leone
wetland management
politics
wetland
Ethiopia
decentralization
wetlands
management
livelihood
community
evidence
Decentralization
Institutional arrangements
Wetlands

Cite this

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Decentralization and local institutional arrangements for wetland management in Ethiopia and Sierra Leone. / Maconachie, Roy; Dixon, Alan B.; Wood, Adrian.

In: Applied Geography, Vol. 29, No. 2, 04.2009, p. 269-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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