Developing Young Creative Minds

A scoping exercise

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

1. Introduction1.1 Mental health issues account for a significant proportion of the burden of ill-health experienced by young people and it is estimated that 75% of mental illness in adult life starts during adolescence. Yet, national demand for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) far outstrips capacity1. Across the UK, many young people referred to CAMHS have lengthy waits to access treatment. Additionally, there is evidence ofsignificant numbers of children and young people who are in need of CAMHS provision, but who are not being referred into, and/or are not able to access, services due to limited resources being directed towards those with more severe and complex difficulties. Yet, there is mounting evidence that early intervention and community-based interventions can help to prevent difficulties becoming more severe and entrenched (and thus harder to treat)2. 1.2 There is an acknowledged need in the UK for more community-centred ways of working in health and social care, and an increasing focus on empowering individuals and communities to engage in participatory development of, and decision making about, health and social care services. National drivers (e.g. NHS 10-year plan) promote a move towards a more socially-community-driven model of health and social care, in particular through what is now commonly referred to as ‘social prescribing’3. It is increasingly acknowledged that creative activity can have positive impacts on physical and mental health, improving clinical and social outcomes4.1.3It isadditionally recognised that services for children and young people specifically require co-production in terms of both design and evaluation. Creative Minds has, from inception, made every effort to work together with all stakeholders, including serviceusers, in planning, development and implementation. The drive to empower members of the public to engage in participatory development of and decision making about services is reflected in a burgeoning interest in participatory research approaches, commonly referred to in terms of co-production.
Original languageEnglish
Commissioning bodySouth West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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mental health
coproduction
health service
adolescent
health
community
decision making
development planning
number of children
research approach
mental illness
adolescence
evidence
driver
stakeholder
demand
evaluation
resources

Cite this

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abstract = "1. Introduction1.1 Mental health issues account for a significant proportion of the burden of ill-health experienced by young people and it is estimated that 75{\%} of mental illness in adult life starts during adolescence. Yet, national demand for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) far outstrips capacity1. Across the UK, many young people referred to CAMHS have lengthy waits to access treatment. Additionally, there is evidence ofsignificant numbers of children and young people who are in need of CAMHS provision, but who are not being referred into, and/or are not able to access, services due to limited resources being directed towards those with more severe and complex difficulties. Yet, there is mounting evidence that early intervention and community-based interventions can help to prevent difficulties becoming more severe and entrenched (and thus harder to treat)2. 1.2 There is an acknowledged need in the UK for more community-centred ways of working in health and social care, and an increasing focus on empowering individuals and communities to engage in participatory development of, and decision making about, health and social care services. National drivers (e.g. NHS 10-year plan) promote a move towards a more socially-community-driven model of health and social care, in particular through what is now commonly referred to as ‘social prescribing’3. It is increasingly acknowledged that creative activity can have positive impacts on physical and mental health, improving clinical and social outcomes4.1.3It isadditionally recognised that services for children and young people specifically require co-production in terms of both design and evaluation. Creative Minds has, from inception, made every effort to work together with all stakeholders, including serviceusers, in planning, development and implementation. The drive to empower members of the public to engage in participatory development of and decision making about services is reflected in a burgeoning interest in participatory research approaches, commonly referred to in terms of co-production.",
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Developing Young Creative Minds : A scoping exercise. / Percy-Smith, Barry.

2019. 8 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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