Development of condition monitoring techniques for a transverse flux motor

B. S. Payne, S. M. Husband, A. D. Ball

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in electrical machine design have enabled Rolls-Royce to develop a novel 20MW machine for marine propulsion. This machine is named a Transverse Flux Motor (TFM) because of the three-dimensional flux paths created within it. The TFM will potentially provide propulsion power to a fleet of future Royal Navy vessels as part of the UK MoD drive towards the All Electric Ship (AES) concept. To minimise Through Life Costs (TLC) whilst maintaining 100% availability during the vessels operating lifetime, part of the TFM program includes development of an integrated condition-based monitoring system. The development and testing of such a condition-based monitoring system was also identified as a potential source of valuable information during TFM design. This paper provides an outline of the novel machine configuration, discusses the identification of possible failure modes, the symptoms exhibited by these and the information content that different measurement parameters potentially yield. In particular, this paper focuses on the development of Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) by the monitoring of magnetic flux within the machine. A theoretical analysis of the flux paths is provided and then some real results from testing of prototype TFM machines are illustrated. The relevance of monitoring in the ways described is then discussed (in relation to manufacturers and end users of more conventional machines). In addition, the role that the outlined work has to play in the monitoring of complete systems is summarised. This is of particular importance given that the maintenance function is more recently being driven by a business-centred approach and is seen as key to operation of the whole plant, not simply individual equipments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-144
Number of pages6
JournalIEE Conference Publication
Issue number487
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference on Power Electronics, Machines and Drives - Bath, United Kingdom
Duration: 16 Apr 200218 Apr 2002

Fingerprint

Condition monitoring
Fluxes
Monitoring
Ship propulsion
Machine design
Testing
Magnetic flux
Failure modes
Propulsion
Ships
Availability
Costs
Industry

Cite this

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title = "Development of condition monitoring techniques for a transverse flux motor",
abstract = "Advances in electrical machine design have enabled Rolls-Royce to develop a novel 20MW machine for marine propulsion. This machine is named a Transverse Flux Motor (TFM) because of the three-dimensional flux paths created within it. The TFM will potentially provide propulsion power to a fleet of future Royal Navy vessels as part of the UK MoD drive towards the All Electric Ship (AES) concept. To minimise Through Life Costs (TLC) whilst maintaining 100{\%} availability during the vessels operating lifetime, part of the TFM program includes development of an integrated condition-based monitoring system. The development and testing of such a condition-based monitoring system was also identified as a potential source of valuable information during TFM design. This paper provides an outline of the novel machine configuration, discusses the identification of possible failure modes, the symptoms exhibited by these and the information content that different measurement parameters potentially yield. In particular, this paper focuses on the development of Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) by the monitoring of magnetic flux within the machine. A theoretical analysis of the flux paths is provided and then some real results from testing of prototype TFM machines are illustrated. The relevance of monitoring in the ways described is then discussed (in relation to manufacturers and end users of more conventional machines). In addition, the role that the outlined work has to play in the monitoring of complete systems is summarised. This is of particular importance given that the maintenance function is more recently being driven by a business-centred approach and is seen as key to operation of the whole plant, not simply individual equipments.",
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Development of condition monitoring techniques for a transverse flux motor. / Payne, B. S.; Husband, S. M.; Ball, A. D.

In: IEE Conference Publication, No. 487, 23.09.2002, p. 139-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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