Abstract

The structure and function of by-products of berry-processing industries are reviewed, with particular attention to dietary fibre (DF) and its effects in food products. The complex chemical composition and physicochemical characteristics of DF have been investigated and strategies for extraction of specific fractions that provide tailored technological and physiological functionality have been reviewed. The aim of this review is to describe in detail the structural composition and isolation methods of dietary fibre derived from berry by-products, and to explore their potential functionality in foods. The goal is to introduce DF from berry waste streams into the food chain, for which bread is a major vehicle. However, the appeal of bread lies in its aerated structure, for which DF is generally detrimental. The technological influence of DF on the formation and stabilization of the aerated structure of bread is therefore reviewed, in order to understand how to incorporate DF into bread while maintaining palatability. The aerated structure of bread is stabilized by two mechanisms: the gluten matrix and the liquid film surrounding bubbles. Incorporating DF successfully into bread requires understanding its interactions with both of these mechanisms. DF fractions from berries offer superior nutritional value compared to cereal fibre, potentially with less damage to bread structure, due to the higher proportion of soluble fibre. By-products from berry-processing industries could be used as a source of technologically and nutritionally distinctive DF to fabricate foods with enhanced nutritional value.

LanguageEnglish
Pages4189-4199
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume99
Issue number9
Early online date8 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

processing waste
Bread
Dietary Fiber
breads
small fruits
Fruit
dietary fiber
Nutritive Value
Food
byproducts
Industry
nutritive value
industry
Food Chain
Glutens
soluble fiber
isolation techniques
bubbles
palatability
gluten

Cite this

@article{04f6656dd6534f50a0dd78c3a9c11c51,
title = "Dietary Fibre from Berry‐Processing waste and its impact on bread structure: A review",
abstract = "The structure and function of by-products of berry-processing industries are reviewed, with particular attention to dietary fibre (DF) and its effects in food products. The complex chemical composition and physicochemical characteristics of DF have been investigated and strategies for extraction of specific fractions that provide tailored technological and physiological functionality have been reviewed. The aim of this review is to describe in detail the structural composition and isolation methods of dietary fibre derived from berry by-products, and to explore their potential functionality in foods. The goal is to introduce DF from berry waste streams into the food chain, for which bread is a major vehicle. However, the appeal of bread lies in its aerated structure, for which DF is generally detrimental. The technological influence of DF on the formation and stabilization of the aerated structure of bread is therefore reviewed, in order to understand how to incorporate DF into bread while maintaining palatability. The aerated structure of bread is stabilized by two mechanisms: the gluten matrix and the liquid film surrounding bubbles. Incorporating DF successfully into bread requires understanding its interactions with both of these mechanisms. DF fractions from berries offer superior nutritional value compared to cereal fibre, potentially with less damage to bread structure, due to the higher proportion of soluble fibre. By-products from berry-processing industries could be used as a source of technologically and nutritionally distinctive DF to fabricate foods with enhanced nutritional value.",
keywords = "Dietary fibre, Berries, By-products, Fractionation, Bread, fractionation, bread, dietary fibre, berries, by-products",
author = "Jekaterina Alba and Grant Campbell and Vasileios Kontogiorgos",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jsfa.9633",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "4189--4199",
journal = "Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture",
issn = "0022-5142",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary Fibre from Berry‐Processing waste and its impact on bread structure

T2 - Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

AU - Alba, Jekaterina

AU - Campbell, Grant

AU - Kontogiorgos, Vasileios

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - The structure and function of by-products of berry-processing industries are reviewed, with particular attention to dietary fibre (DF) and its effects in food products. The complex chemical composition and physicochemical characteristics of DF have been investigated and strategies for extraction of specific fractions that provide tailored technological and physiological functionality have been reviewed. The aim of this review is to describe in detail the structural composition and isolation methods of dietary fibre derived from berry by-products, and to explore their potential functionality in foods. The goal is to introduce DF from berry waste streams into the food chain, for which bread is a major vehicle. However, the appeal of bread lies in its aerated structure, for which DF is generally detrimental. The technological influence of DF on the formation and stabilization of the aerated structure of bread is therefore reviewed, in order to understand how to incorporate DF into bread while maintaining palatability. The aerated structure of bread is stabilized by two mechanisms: the gluten matrix and the liquid film surrounding bubbles. Incorporating DF successfully into bread requires understanding its interactions with both of these mechanisms. DF fractions from berries offer superior nutritional value compared to cereal fibre, potentially with less damage to bread structure, due to the higher proportion of soluble fibre. By-products from berry-processing industries could be used as a source of technologically and nutritionally distinctive DF to fabricate foods with enhanced nutritional value.

AB - The structure and function of by-products of berry-processing industries are reviewed, with particular attention to dietary fibre (DF) and its effects in food products. The complex chemical composition and physicochemical characteristics of DF have been investigated and strategies for extraction of specific fractions that provide tailored technological and physiological functionality have been reviewed. The aim of this review is to describe in detail the structural composition and isolation methods of dietary fibre derived from berry by-products, and to explore their potential functionality in foods. The goal is to introduce DF from berry waste streams into the food chain, for which bread is a major vehicle. However, the appeal of bread lies in its aerated structure, for which DF is generally detrimental. The technological influence of DF on the formation and stabilization of the aerated structure of bread is therefore reviewed, in order to understand how to incorporate DF into bread while maintaining palatability. The aerated structure of bread is stabilized by two mechanisms: the gluten matrix and the liquid film surrounding bubbles. Incorporating DF successfully into bread requires understanding its interactions with both of these mechanisms. DF fractions from berries offer superior nutritional value compared to cereal fibre, potentially with less damage to bread structure, due to the higher proportion of soluble fibre. By-products from berry-processing industries could be used as a source of technologically and nutritionally distinctive DF to fabricate foods with enhanced nutritional value.

KW - Dietary fibre

KW - Berries

KW - By-products

KW - Fractionation

KW - Bread

KW - fractionation

KW - bread

KW - dietary fibre

KW - berries

KW - by-products

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063002719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jsfa.9633

DO - 10.1002/jsfa.9633

M3 - Review article

VL - 99

SP - 4189

EP - 4199

JO - Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

JF - Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

SN - 0022-5142

IS - 9

ER -