Digital Evidence

Disclosure and Admissibility in the United Kingdom Jurisdiction

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Digital forensics, originally known as computer forensics, first presented itself in the 1970s. During the first investigations, financial fraud proved to be the most common cause on suspects’ computers. Since then, digital forensics has grown in importance in situations where digital devices are used in the commission of a crime. The original focus of digital forensic investigations was on crimes committed through computers. However, over the past few years, the field has extended to include various other digital devices in which digitally stored information can be processed and used for different types of crimes. This paper explores how the admissibility of digital evidence is governed within the United Kingdom jurisdictions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIGlobal Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World
Subtitle of host publication11th International Conference, ICGS3 2017, London, UK, January 18-20, 2017, Proceedings
EditorsH. Jahankhani, A. Carlile, D. Emm, A. Hosseinian-Far, G. Brown, G. Sexton, A. Jamal
PublisherSpringer, Cham
Pages42-52
Number of pages11
Volume630
ISBN (Electronic)9783319510644
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event11th International Conference on Global Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 18 Jan 201720 Jan 2017
Conference number: 11
http://conferences.gsm.org.uk/icgs3/ (Link to Conference Website)

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on Global Security, Safety and Sustainability
Abbreviated titleICGS3 2017
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period18/01/1720/01/17
Internet address

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jurisdiction
offense
evidence
fraud
cause

Cite this

Montasari, R. (2017). Digital Evidence: Disclosure and Admissibility in the United Kingdom Jurisdiction. In H. Jahankhani, A. Carlile, D. Emm, A. Hosseinian-Far, G. Brown, G. Sexton, & A. Jamal (Eds.), IGlobal Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World: 11th International Conference, ICGS3 2017, London, UK, January 18-20, 2017, Proceedings (Vol. 630, pp. 42-52). Springer, Cham.
Montasari, Reza. / Digital Evidence : Disclosure and Admissibility in the United Kingdom Jurisdiction. IGlobal Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World: 11th International Conference, ICGS3 2017, London, UK, January 18-20, 2017, Proceedings. editor / H. Jahankhani ; A. Carlile ; D. Emm ; A. Hosseinian-Far ; G. Brown ; G. Sexton ; A. Jamal. Vol. 630 Springer, Cham, 2017. pp. 42-52
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Montasari, R 2017, Digital Evidence: Disclosure and Admissibility in the United Kingdom Jurisdiction. in H Jahankhani, A Carlile, D Emm, A Hosseinian-Far, G Brown, G Sexton & A Jamal (eds), IGlobal Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World: 11th International Conference, ICGS3 2017, London, UK, January 18-20, 2017, Proceedings. vol. 630, Springer, Cham, pp. 42-52, 11th International Conference on Global Security, Safety and Sustainability, London, United Kingdom, 18/01/17.

Digital Evidence : Disclosure and Admissibility in the United Kingdom Jurisdiction. / Montasari, Reza.

IGlobal Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World: 11th International Conference, ICGS3 2017, London, UK, January 18-20, 2017, Proceedings. ed. / H. Jahankhani; A. Carlile; D. Emm; A. Hosseinian-Far; G. Brown; G. Sexton; A. Jamal. Vol. 630 Springer, Cham, 2017. p. 42-52.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Montasari R. Digital Evidence: Disclosure and Admissibility in the United Kingdom Jurisdiction. In Jahankhani H, Carlile A, Emm D, Hosseinian-Far A, Brown G, Sexton G, Jamal A, editors, IGlobal Security, Safety and Sustainability: The Security Challenges of the Connected World: 11th International Conference, ICGS3 2017, London, UK, January 18-20, 2017, Proceedings. Vol. 630. Springer, Cham. 2017. p. 42-52