Do More Immigrants Equal More Crime?

Drawing a Bridge Between First Generation Immigrant Concentration and Recorded Crime Rates

Dainis Ignatans, Timothy Roebuck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Immigration and its relationship with crime have long been discussed and researched in a variety of manners. There has been focus on a wide spectrum of research questions concerning the issue, such as public perceptions, immigrant perceptions, crime rates and immigration trends. The present article considers the crime rates in the areas of the UK with the highest concentrations of first-generation immigrants. The areas were gathered using census data and crime rates from police recorded statistics. The first-generation immigrants were categorised by their area of origin: Europe, Africa and Asia. Quantitative analysis showed that the areas containing the highest concentration of first-generation immigrants saw a drop in crime compared to the areas with the second highest concentration. Results also showed that certain immigrant groups combined in high concentrations make for lower crime rates. Such findings suggest that there may be a cultural aspect at play, and begs further research.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages19
JournalCrime, Security and Society
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Cite this

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