Does acceptance of power distance influence propensities for problematic Internet use?

Evidence from a cross‐cultural study

Christian Montag, Eilish Duke, Peng Sha, Min Zhou, Sindermann Conny, Mei Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction
Several studies suggest that Asian countries are particularly afflicted by problematic Internet use (PIU).

Methods
The present study investigates whether individual differences in the acceptance of power distance can be linked to overuse of the Internet in Germany and in China. Power distance has been discussed as an essential dimension on which Asian and Western societies differ. In the present study, we investigate two large non‐clinical samples from Germany (n = 297) and China (n = 556) to address this question.

Results
Both in Germany and in China, high acceptance of power distance was positively associated with PIU. These effects were more pronounced in China compared with Germany. Moreover, the observed effects were stronger in males compared with females.

Discussion
Clearly, these findings are just a starting point and need to be replicated in the future. Clinical populations and a further important difference variable – collectivism – also merit consideration in future work.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-301
Number of pages6
JournalAsia-Pacific Psychiatry
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Internet
Germany
China
Individuality
Power (Psychology)
Population

Cite this

Montag, Christian ; Duke, Eilish ; Sha, Peng ; Zhou, Min ; Conny, Sindermann ; Li, Mei. / Does acceptance of power distance influence propensities for problematic Internet use? Evidence from a cross‐cultural study. In: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 296-301.
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Does acceptance of power distance influence propensities for problematic Internet use? Evidence from a cross‐cultural study. / Montag, Christian; Duke, Eilish; Sha, Peng; Zhou, Min; Conny, Sindermann; Li, Mei.

In: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry, Vol. 8, No. 4, 17.12.2015, p. 296-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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