Education and schooling 5–11 years

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Primary schools in England have been the recipients, in recent years, of a litany of policies that can be defined by targets, performance criteria and league tables (Ball, 2003; Jeffrey, 2003; Troman and Jeffrey, 2007) and this has resulted, arguably, in a ‘performative’ culture (Pheysey, 1993). That is, a culture where teachers are required to perform their duties in relation to externally defined targets, and each pupil’s performance is judged against these same targets. This performative context is kept under scrutiny and reported upon through inspections by the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (known commonly as, and hereafter, Ofsted). Primary schools in England today are

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 EEE3 4 5 6 7 8 9111 20 1 2 3 4 5EEE 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

This chapter draws on the context of primary schools in England before contrasting this with that of other nations. It opens with an analysis of the most recent reports of the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, on ten of the lowest achieving (based on national Standard Assessment Tests) primary schools in England. The chapter then locates these findings within the gradual politicisation of the English primary curriculum asking ‘how did we get to here?’ The relationship between teachers, pupils, parents and the State is at the heart of this consideration; education policy in England, as this chapter will demonstrate, has positioned professionals, pupils and parents in terms of expectations and roles. These are sometimes explicitly defined in recent policy documentation and are a new departure in terms of the role of the State in relation to education. Finally, the chapter explores the ways in which other countries (namely Sweden, Norway, France and the Republic of Ireland) monitor the performance of pupils and teachers at the primary phase of education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Companion to Education
EditorsJames Arthur, Andrew Peterson
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherTaylor and Francis Ltd.
Chapter19
Pages179-189
Number of pages11
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9780203802243
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

primary school
pupil
education
phase of education
parents
teacher-pupil relationship
performance
politicization
teacher
school
Norway
documentation
Ireland
republic
Sweden
recipient
France
curriculum

Cite this

Bryan, H. (2013). Education and schooling 5–11 years. In J. Arthur, & A. Peterson (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Education (1 ed., pp. 179-189). London: Taylor and Francis Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203802243
Bryan, Hazel. / Education and schooling 5–11 years. The Routledge Companion to Education. editor / James Arthur ; Andrew Peterson. 1. ed. London : Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2013. pp. 179-189
@inbook{01edd9e1428541b2a52406912c6a9297,
title = "Education and schooling 5–11 years",
abstract = "Primary schools in England have been the recipients, in recent years, of a litany of policies that can be defined by targets, performance criteria and league tables (Ball, 2003; Jeffrey, 2003; Troman and Jeffrey, 2007) and this has resulted, arguably, in a ‘performative’ culture (Pheysey, 1993). That is, a culture where teachers are required to perform their duties in relation to externally defined targets, and each pupil’s performance is judged against these same targets. This performative context is kept under scrutiny and reported upon through inspections by the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (known commonly as, and hereafter, Ofsted). Primary schools in England today are3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 EEE3 4 5 6 7 8 9111 20 1 2 3 4 5EEE 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7This chapter draws on the context of primary schools in England before contrasting this with that of other nations. It opens with an analysis of the most recent reports of the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, on ten of the lowest achieving (based on national Standard Assessment Tests) primary schools in England. The chapter then locates these findings within the gradual politicisation of the English primary curriculum asking ‘how did we get to here?’ The relationship between teachers, pupils, parents and the State is at the heart of this consideration; education policy in England, as this chapter will demonstrate, has positioned professionals, pupils and parents in terms of expectations and roles. These are sometimes explicitly defined in recent policy documentation and are a new departure in terms of the role of the State in relation to education. Finally, the chapter explores the ways in which other countries (namely Sweden, Norway, France and the Republic of Ireland) monitor the performance of pupils and teachers at the primary phase of education.",
author = "Hazel Bryan",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "23",
doi = "10.4324/9780203802243",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780203802243",
pages = "179--189",
editor = "Arthur, {James } and Peterson, {Andrew }",
booktitle = "The Routledge Companion to Education",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
address = "United Kingdom",
edition = "1",

}

Bryan, H 2013, Education and schooling 5–11 years. in J Arthur & A Peterson (eds), The Routledge Companion to Education. 1 edn, Taylor and Francis Ltd., London, pp. 179-189. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203802243

Education and schooling 5–11 years. / Bryan, Hazel.

The Routledge Companion to Education. ed. / James Arthur; Andrew Peterson. 1. ed. London : Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2013. p. 179-189.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Education and schooling 5–11 years

AU - Bryan, Hazel

PY - 2013/7/23

Y1 - 2013/7/23

N2 - Primary schools in England have been the recipients, in recent years, of a litany of policies that can be defined by targets, performance criteria and league tables (Ball, 2003; Jeffrey, 2003; Troman and Jeffrey, 2007) and this has resulted, arguably, in a ‘performative’ culture (Pheysey, 1993). That is, a culture where teachers are required to perform their duties in relation to externally defined targets, and each pupil’s performance is judged against these same targets. This performative context is kept under scrutiny and reported upon through inspections by the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (known commonly as, and hereafter, Ofsted). Primary schools in England today are3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 EEE3 4 5 6 7 8 9111 20 1 2 3 4 5EEE 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7This chapter draws on the context of primary schools in England before contrasting this with that of other nations. It opens with an analysis of the most recent reports of the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, on ten of the lowest achieving (based on national Standard Assessment Tests) primary schools in England. The chapter then locates these findings within the gradual politicisation of the English primary curriculum asking ‘how did we get to here?’ The relationship between teachers, pupils, parents and the State is at the heart of this consideration; education policy in England, as this chapter will demonstrate, has positioned professionals, pupils and parents in terms of expectations and roles. These are sometimes explicitly defined in recent policy documentation and are a new departure in terms of the role of the State in relation to education. Finally, the chapter explores the ways in which other countries (namely Sweden, Norway, France and the Republic of Ireland) monitor the performance of pupils and teachers at the primary phase of education.

AB - Primary schools in England have been the recipients, in recent years, of a litany of policies that can be defined by targets, performance criteria and league tables (Ball, 2003; Jeffrey, 2003; Troman and Jeffrey, 2007) and this has resulted, arguably, in a ‘performative’ culture (Pheysey, 1993). That is, a culture where teachers are required to perform their duties in relation to externally defined targets, and each pupil’s performance is judged against these same targets. This performative context is kept under scrutiny and reported upon through inspections by the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (known commonly as, and hereafter, Ofsted). Primary schools in England today are3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 EEE3 4 5 6 7 8 9111 20 1 2 3 4 5EEE 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7This chapter draws on the context of primary schools in England before contrasting this with that of other nations. It opens with an analysis of the most recent reports of the lead inspecting body for schools, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, on ten of the lowest achieving (based on national Standard Assessment Tests) primary schools in England. The chapter then locates these findings within the gradual politicisation of the English primary curriculum asking ‘how did we get to here?’ The relationship between teachers, pupils, parents and the State is at the heart of this consideration; education policy in England, as this chapter will demonstrate, has positioned professionals, pupils and parents in terms of expectations and roles. These are sometimes explicitly defined in recent policy documentation and are a new departure in terms of the role of the State in relation to education. Finally, the chapter explores the ways in which other countries (namely Sweden, Norway, France and the Republic of Ireland) monitor the performance of pupils and teachers at the primary phase of education.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84918915172&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4324/9780203802243

DO - 10.4324/9780203802243

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780203802243

SP - 179

EP - 189

BT - The Routledge Companion to Education

A2 - Arthur, James

A2 - Peterson, Andrew

PB - Taylor and Francis Ltd.

CY - London

ER -

Bryan H. Education and schooling 5–11 years. In Arthur J, Peterson A, editors, The Routledge Companion to Education. 1 ed. London: Taylor and Francis Ltd. 2013. p. 179-189 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203802243