Effect of aging and ice structuring proteins on the morphology of frozen hydrated gluten networks

Vassilis Kontogiorgos, H. Douglas Goff, Stefan Kasapis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present investigation constitutes an attempt to rationalize the effect of aging and ice structuring proteins (ISPs) on the network morphology of frozen hydrated gluten. In doing so, it employs differential scanning calorimetry, time-domain NMR, dynamic oscillation on shear, creep testing, and electron microscopy. Experimentation and first principles modeling allows identification and description of the processes of ice formation and recrystallization in molecular terms. It is demonstrated that in the absence of a readily discernible glass transition temperature in gluten-ice composites, the approach of considering the melting point and aging at constant or fluctuating temperature conditions in the vicinity of this point can provide a valid index of functional quality. A theoretical framework supporting the concept of capillary confined frozen water in the gluten matrix was advanced, and it was found that ISPs were effective in controlling recrystallization both within these confines and within ice in the bulk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1293-1299
Number of pages7
JournalBiomacromolecules
Volume8
Issue number4
Early online date7 Mar 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Glutens
Ice
Aging of materials
Proteins
Creep testing
Electron microscopy
Melting point
Differential scanning calorimetry
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Water
Composite materials
Temperature

Cite this

Kontogiorgos, Vassilis ; Goff, H. Douglas ; Kasapis, Stefan. / Effect of aging and ice structuring proteins on the morphology of frozen hydrated gluten networks. In: Biomacromolecules. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 1293-1299.
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Effect of aging and ice structuring proteins on the morphology of frozen hydrated gluten networks. / Kontogiorgos, Vassilis; Goff, H. Douglas; Kasapis, Stefan.

In: Biomacromolecules, Vol. 8, No. 4, 01.04.2007, p. 1293-1299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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