Effects of dispersal mode on the environmental and spatial correlates of nestedness and species turnover in pond communities

Matthew J. Hill, Jani Heino, Ian Thornhill, David B. Ryves, Paul Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in metacommunity theory have made a significant contribution to understanding the drivers of variation in biological communities. However, there has been limited empirical research exploring the expression of metacommunity theory for two fundamental components of beta diversity: nestedness and species turnover. In this paper, we examine the influence of local environmental and a range of spatial variables (hydrological connectivity, proximity and overall spatial structure) on total beta diversity and the nestedness and turnover components of beta diversity for the entire macroinvertebrate community and active and passively dispersing taxa within pond habitats. High beta diversity almost entirely reflects patterns of species turnover (replacement) rather than nestedness (differences in species richness) in our dataset. Local environmental variables were the main drivers of total beta diversity, nestedness and turnover when the entire community was considered and for both active and passively dispersing taxa. The influence of spatial processes on passively dispersing taxa, total beta diversity and nestedness was significantly greater than for actively dispersing taxa. Our results suggest that species sorting (local environmental variables) operating through niche processes was the primary mechanism driving total beta diversity, nestedness and turnover for the entire community and active and passively dispersing taxa. In contrast, spatial factors (hydrological connectivity, proximity and spatial eigenvectors) only exerted a secondary influence on the nestedness and turnover components of beta diversity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1575-1585
Number of pages11
JournalOikos
Volume126
Issue number11
Early online date17 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017
Externally publishedYes

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nestedness
turnover
pond
connectivity
hydrologic factors
environmental factors
effect
macroinvertebrates
sorting
macroinvertebrate
niche
niches
replacement
species richness
species diversity
habitat
habitats

Cite this

Hill, Matthew J. ; Heino, Jani ; Thornhill, Ian ; Ryves, David B. ; Wood, Paul. / Effects of dispersal mode on the environmental and spatial correlates of nestedness and species turnover in pond communities. In: Oikos. 2017 ; Vol. 126, No. 11. pp. 1575-1585.
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Effects of dispersal mode on the environmental and spatial correlates of nestedness and species turnover in pond communities. / Hill, Matthew J.; Heino, Jani; Thornhill, Ian ; Ryves, David B.; Wood, Paul.

In: Oikos, Vol. 126, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. 1575-1585.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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