Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand

Terence V. McCann, Wallapa Songprakun, John Stephenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

LanguageEnglish
Pages62-70
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

Thailand
Caregivers
Depression
Nurse Clinicians
Control Groups
Intention to Treat Analysis
Cognitive Therapy
Analysis of Variance
Mental Health
Randomized Controlled Trials
Guidelines

Cite this

@article{67849c5c081045bbb07cb640a1464150,
title = "Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand",
abstract = "Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.",
keywords = "cognitive behaviour therapy, controlled trial, depression, randomized, resilience, self-help",
author = "McCann, {Terence V.} and Wallapa Songprakun and John Stephenson",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/inm.12178",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "62--70",
journal = "International Journal of Mental Health Nursing",
issn = "1445-8330",
publisher = "Blackwell Science Asia Pty. Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand. / McCann, Terence V.; Songprakun, Wallapa; Stephenson, John.

In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 62-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand

AU - McCann, Terence V.

AU - Songprakun, Wallapa

AU - Stephenson, John

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

AB - Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

KW - cognitive behaviour therapy

KW - controlled trial

KW - depression

KW - randomized

KW - resilience

KW - self-help

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85013713406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/inm.12178

DO - 10.1111/inm.12178

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 62

EP - 70

JO - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

T2 - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

JF - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

SN - 1445-8330

IS - 1

ER -