Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand

Terence V. McCann, Wallapa Songprakun, John Stephenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-70
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

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Thailand
Caregivers
Depression
Nurse Clinicians
Control Groups
Intention to Treat Analysis
Cognitive Therapy
Analysis of Variance
Mental Health
Randomized Controlled Trials
Guidelines

Cite this

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Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand. / McCann, Terence V.; Songprakun, Wallapa; Stephenson, John.

In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 62-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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