Emotional well-being, spiritual well-being and resilience of advanced clinical practitioners in the United Kingdom during COVID-19: an exploratory mixed method study

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Abstract

Aim
To investigate the emotional and spiritual well-being and resilience of advanced clinical practitioners during COVID.

Background
Resilience is a protective factor for emotional and spiritual well-being. The pandemic has taken a toll on health professionals due to significant physical and psychological pressures. The impact of COVID-19 on well-being and resilience of advanced clinical practitioners is not known.

Method
Three validated scales assessed resilience, emotional and spiritual well-being. Seven hundred and thirty-four responses were analysed.

Results
Participants have low levels of emotional and spiritual well-being. Participants with higher levels of spirituality reported greater resilience and those with higher levels of resilience reported greater well-being.

Conclusion
Advanced clinical practitioners' emotional and spiritual well-being and resilience has been impacted significantly during the pandemic. Interventions are needed at team, service and systems levels to enhance well-being and resilience.

Implications for Nursing Management
Worryingly low levels of well-being and resilience in advanced clinical practitioners have been found; support to increase well-being and resilience is needed. Our findings can inform policies, resources and interventions aimed at enabling positive adaptation and enhanced resilience. Understanding and responding to the scale and impact of COVID-19 on health care workers has become a key government recommendation following the pandemic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)883-891
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Volume30
Issue number4
Early online date23 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2022

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