EU Students in HE: A Case Study of Games and Web Students

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Having taught home, European Union (EU) and international students in Higher Education (HE) over a range of Games and Web courses for a combined total of 50 years, the authors have been consistently impressed with the ambition and achievements of their EU students. In this chapter, research relating to student relocation and internationalisation are assessed with reference to the EU and, in particular, former Eastern-bloc countries.
Theoretical benefits of study in the UK are researched and indicate that: EU students’ home country’s second language is English; that an English study language is preferred; UK universities are seen as world-competing institutions; software for this sector is largely produced by English-speaking nations (USA and UK); programming languages were developed in English; and finance implications (the rise of tuition fees) hasn’t put off the ambitious and high-attaining applicants.
Graduate feedback confirms the desire to work in an English-speaking environment for maximum employability, the global stage being open to them via a UK degree. Our degrees are seen as commanding high value and respect worldwide and opening up employment opportunities by rising above any perceived home-country barriers. Our EU students report having researched the University and course extensively before choosing their study and many want to learn more and to be pushed harder and further. Negatively, they comment about the lack of ambition and motivation in some of their respective cohorts, many of which are home students. Their feedback confirms the authors’ impression of EU students and provides many areas to improve the existing course offerings.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransnational Higher Education in Computing Courses
Subtitle of host publicationExperiences and Reflections
EditorsJenny Carter, Clive Rosen
PublisherSpringer, Cham
Chapter13
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9783030282516
ISBN (Print)9783030282509, 3030282503
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 29 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

student union
speaking
education
student
tuition fee
Warsaw Pact
employability
programming language
employment opportunity
move
internationalization
applicant
English language
respect
finance
graduate
university
lack
language

Cite this

O'Grady, M., Gledhill, D., & Marples, D. (Accepted/In press). EU Students in HE: A Case Study of Games and Web Students. In J. Carter, & C. Rosen (Eds.), Transnational Higher Education in Computing Courses: Experiences and Reflections (1st ed.). Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28251-6
O'Grady, Michael ; Gledhill, Duke ; Marples, Daryl. / EU Students in HE : A Case Study of Games and Web Students. Transnational Higher Education in Computing Courses: Experiences and Reflections. editor / Jenny Carter ; Clive Rosen. 1st. ed. Springer, Cham, 2019.
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O'Grady, M, Gledhill, D & Marples, D 2019, EU Students in HE: A Case Study of Games and Web Students. in J Carter & C Rosen (eds), Transnational Higher Education in Computing Courses: Experiences and Reflections. 1st edn, Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28251-6

EU Students in HE : A Case Study of Games and Web Students. / O'Grady, Michael; Gledhill, Duke; Marples, Daryl.

Transnational Higher Education in Computing Courses: Experiences and Reflections. ed. / Jenny Carter; Clive Rosen. 1st. ed. Springer, Cham, 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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O'Grady M, Gledhill D, Marples D. EU Students in HE: A Case Study of Games and Web Students. In Carter J, Rosen C, editors, Transnational Higher Education in Computing Courses: Experiences and Reflections. 1st ed. Springer, Cham. 2019 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28251-6