Evaluating the validity of anger regulation problems, interpersonal style, and disturbed mental state for predicting inpatient violence

Michael Doyle, Mairead Dolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has been conducted to try to identify risk factors to help predict which patients will be violent during psychiatric hospitalization. Despite the relatively large amount of research conducted, it is difficult to draw any firm conclusions, as the studies vary considerably in study design, methods used, and choice of outcome measures. Studies also tend to focus on risk prediction, even though risk management is the primary aim of clinical practice in mental health services and few studies have focused on a theoretical basis for understanding violence. This study assessed the predictive validity of brief assessment scales hi a sample of 94 forensic inpatients who had been inpatient for a median of 521 days, to test the hypotheses that anger regulation problems, interpersonal style, and disturbed mental state would be linked to increased violence risk in a forensic hospital during a hospital stay. The outcome variables for this study were physical violence against another and/or clear threats of physical violence. The results of this study provide support for the hypotheses, and this remained the case after controlling for age, gender, length of stay, and presence of major mental disorder. The findings should not only assist clinicians with assessment and management of risk but also support the reconceptualizing of risk prediction research to reflect the task of clinical risk management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)783-798
Number of pages16
JournalBehavioral Sciences and the Law
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

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