Evaluation of an evidence-based patient educational booklet for management of whiplash-associated disorders

Tim McClune, Anthony Burton, Gordon Waddell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to develop and evaluate an evidence based educational booklet on whiplash associated disorders. Methods: A comprehensive review of the available scientific evidence produced a set of unambiguous patient centred messages that challenge unhelpful beliefs about whiplash and promote an active approach to recovery. These messages were incorporated into a novel booklet, which was then evaluated qualitatively for end user acceptability and its ability to impart the intended messages, and quantitatively for its ability to improve beliefs about whiplash and what to do about it. The subjects comprised people attending accident and emergency or manipulative practice with a whiplash associated disorder, along with a sample of workers without a whiplash associated disorder (n = 142). Results: The qualitative results showed that the booklet was considered easy to read, understandable, believable, and conveyed its key messages. Quantitatively, it produced a substantial statistically significant improvement in beliefs about whiplash among accident and emergency patients (mean 6.5, 95% CI 3.9 to 9.1, p<0.001), and among workers (mean 9.4, 95% CI 7.9 to 10.9, p<0.001), but the shift in the more chronic manipulation patients was substantially smaller (mean 3.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 6.1, p<0.05). Conclusions: A rigorously developed educational booklet on whiplash (The Whiplash Book) was found acceptable to patients, and capable of improving beliefs about whiplash and its management; it seems suitable for use in the accident and emergency environment, and for wider distribution at the population level. A randomised controlled trial would be required to determine whether it exerts an effect on behaviour and clinical outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-517
Number of pages4
JournalEmergency Medicine Journal
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Pamphlets
Accidents
Emergencies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Demography

Cite this

@article{32b4af2de6a44029a16c3f21dc78cd39,
title = "Evaluation of an evidence-based patient educational booklet for management of whiplash-associated disorders",
abstract = "Objectives: This study aimed to develop and evaluate an evidence based educational booklet on whiplash associated disorders. Methods: A comprehensive review of the available scientific evidence produced a set of unambiguous patient centred messages that challenge unhelpful beliefs about whiplash and promote an active approach to recovery. These messages were incorporated into a novel booklet, which was then evaluated qualitatively for end user acceptability and its ability to impart the intended messages, and quantitatively for its ability to improve beliefs about whiplash and what to do about it. The subjects comprised people attending accident and emergency or manipulative practice with a whiplash associated disorder, along with a sample of workers without a whiplash associated disorder (n = 142). Results: The qualitative results showed that the booklet was considered easy to read, understandable, believable, and conveyed its key messages. Quantitatively, it produced a substantial statistically significant improvement in beliefs about whiplash among accident and emergency patients (mean 6.5, 95{\%} CI 3.9 to 9.1, p<0.001), and among workers (mean 9.4, 95{\%} CI 7.9 to 10.9, p<0.001), but the shift in the more chronic manipulation patients was substantially smaller (mean 3.3, 95{\%} CI 0.5 to 6.1, p<0.05). Conclusions: A rigorously developed educational booklet on whiplash (The Whiplash Book) was found acceptable to patients, and capable of improving beliefs about whiplash and its management; it seems suitable for use in the accident and emergency environment, and for wider distribution at the population level. A randomised controlled trial would be required to determine whether it exerts an effect on behaviour and clinical outcomes.",
author = "Tim McClune and Anthony Burton and Gordon Waddell",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1136/emj.20.6.514",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "514--517",
journal = "Emergency Medicine Journal",
issn = "1472-0205",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

Evaluation of an evidence-based patient educational booklet for management of whiplash-associated disorders. / McClune, Tim; Burton, Anthony; Waddell, Gordon.

In: Emergency Medicine Journal, Vol. 20, No. 6, 2003, p. 514-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of an evidence-based patient educational booklet for management of whiplash-associated disorders

AU - McClune, Tim

AU - Burton, Anthony

AU - Waddell, Gordon

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Objectives: This study aimed to develop and evaluate an evidence based educational booklet on whiplash associated disorders. Methods: A comprehensive review of the available scientific evidence produced a set of unambiguous patient centred messages that challenge unhelpful beliefs about whiplash and promote an active approach to recovery. These messages were incorporated into a novel booklet, which was then evaluated qualitatively for end user acceptability and its ability to impart the intended messages, and quantitatively for its ability to improve beliefs about whiplash and what to do about it. The subjects comprised people attending accident and emergency or manipulative practice with a whiplash associated disorder, along with a sample of workers without a whiplash associated disorder (n = 142). Results: The qualitative results showed that the booklet was considered easy to read, understandable, believable, and conveyed its key messages. Quantitatively, it produced a substantial statistically significant improvement in beliefs about whiplash among accident and emergency patients (mean 6.5, 95% CI 3.9 to 9.1, p<0.001), and among workers (mean 9.4, 95% CI 7.9 to 10.9, p<0.001), but the shift in the more chronic manipulation patients was substantially smaller (mean 3.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 6.1, p<0.05). Conclusions: A rigorously developed educational booklet on whiplash (The Whiplash Book) was found acceptable to patients, and capable of improving beliefs about whiplash and its management; it seems suitable for use in the accident and emergency environment, and for wider distribution at the population level. A randomised controlled trial would be required to determine whether it exerts an effect on behaviour and clinical outcomes.

AB - Objectives: This study aimed to develop and evaluate an evidence based educational booklet on whiplash associated disorders. Methods: A comprehensive review of the available scientific evidence produced a set of unambiguous patient centred messages that challenge unhelpful beliefs about whiplash and promote an active approach to recovery. These messages were incorporated into a novel booklet, which was then evaluated qualitatively for end user acceptability and its ability to impart the intended messages, and quantitatively for its ability to improve beliefs about whiplash and what to do about it. The subjects comprised people attending accident and emergency or manipulative practice with a whiplash associated disorder, along with a sample of workers without a whiplash associated disorder (n = 142). Results: The qualitative results showed that the booklet was considered easy to read, understandable, believable, and conveyed its key messages. Quantitatively, it produced a substantial statistically significant improvement in beliefs about whiplash among accident and emergency patients (mean 6.5, 95% CI 3.9 to 9.1, p<0.001), and among workers (mean 9.4, 95% CI 7.9 to 10.9, p<0.001), but the shift in the more chronic manipulation patients was substantially smaller (mean 3.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 6.1, p<0.05). Conclusions: A rigorously developed educational booklet on whiplash (The Whiplash Book) was found acceptable to patients, and capable of improving beliefs about whiplash and its management; it seems suitable for use in the accident and emergency environment, and for wider distribution at the population level. A randomised controlled trial would be required to determine whether it exerts an effect on behaviour and clinical outcomes.

U2 - 10.1136/emj.20.6.514

DO - 10.1136/emj.20.6.514

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 514

EP - 517

JO - Emergency Medicine Journal

JF - Emergency Medicine Journal

SN - 1472-0205

IS - 6

ER -